The St. Louis directory and register :
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Green Tree Inn ,
St. Louis

[missing figure]
Missouri,

The subscribers respectfully inform their friends
and the public generally, that they have commenced
Business in Co-Partnership, as Inn-Keepers
in the above named very convenient, commodious and
old established house.

Situated No. 85 South Church street, about two squares
below the Roman Catholic Church.—where

Travellers & Others
will find it much to their interest to call, and may
rest assured of meeting with the best accommodations
for themselves and horses, at the Lowest Prices, at
which they can be afforded in St. Louis. They
pledge themselves that their Table shall always be
furnished with the

Best provisions that the country affords.
and that their Bar will be supplied with the most

Choice Liquors. Their stable is
large, convenient to the Inn, and will be always pro-
vided with plenty of good Feed and attentive Ostlers.

☞ Their price, per week, for Boarding and Lod-
ging, is Four Dollars,—those who lodge themselves
will be charged Fifty Cents less.—There is an en-
trance to their Inn between Nos. 86 and 88 south
Main street.

☞ They take in Horses at Livery,
and will at all times keep the best Horses and Carria-
ges for Hire.

LeonardJacobs,
GeorgeBlanchard,

*∗* Notes of the State Bank of Kentucky and its
Branches, and the State Bank of Tennessee and
Branches, will be received at Par in payment of bills.

*

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Wagon Making & Blacksmithing .

[missing figure]

The subscribers respectfully inform their friends
the public, that they have made such ar-
rangements as will enable them to manufacture

Road Wagons, Dearborn Carriages,
Carts & Drays, Hand & Bar-
rows;
also,

[missing figure]
Ploughs
and Harrows,
Of various descriptions, together with every other
kind of Farming utensil, all of which they will war-
rant.—They will sell any of their articles, at a lower
price, than they can be imported. A discount will be
made to Merchants, who purchase to sell again. Re-
pairing done in the best manner, and at the shortest
notice. All orders will be thankfully received and
executed with punctuality and despatch.

Blacksmithing carried on in all its various bran-
ches.

James D.Earl, , and
AndrewLight, .

No 181, north Main st.street above H. street.

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St. Louis
Hat Manufactory .

[missing figure]

The subscriber, at the Sign of the
Golden Hat,
No. 10, North Main-Street, St. Louis,
Respectfully informs his friends and cus-
tomers, that he has just received from his Manu-
factory in Kentucky, a large supply of
Fashionable Hats,
together with his stock on hand, comprising the most
extensive assortment in the Western country; which
he will warrant not inferior to any made in the eastern
cities:—Consisting of;

Men's White Russia Hats,

Men's and Boy's Black and Drab Beavers.

Do. do. do. do. Castors & Rorams,

Children's do. do.

Also—A quantity of Wool Hats.

He still continues to manufacture.

Patent Water Proof,
And all other kind of Hats, agreeably to directions
and at the shortest notice.—Orders thankfully receiv-
ed and attended to with despatch. He returns his
sincere thanks to his customers for their liberal en-
couragement, and hopes to merit a continuance of
their patronage; and informs them that his prices
are at least 20 per cent lower than usual in this place.

J.Christman, .

☞ Kentucky and Tennessee bank paper, will be
taken for Hats.

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Blacksmithing
and
Cast steel edge tool Manufactory ,
St. Louis, North Water-street, below the Team Boat Ferry

The subscriber respectfully informs his friends and
the public that he was employed Lewis Newell in
the manufacture of Cast steel Tools of various kinds,
which he will warrant to be equal to any imported or
made in the United States; among which are the fol-
lowing, viz:

Broad and common Axes.

Chissels of every description.

Augers—of all sizes.

Draw knives, Curriers' Knives
Hoes, Mattocks, and in short every
other kind of Edge Tool;
He also Makes
Plough & Millirons
and executes every kind of work in
the Blacksmithing line with de-
spatch, and at reasonable prices.

Those persons who are not already acquainted with
the superior excellence of the Cast-steel, are informed
That an Axe
made of it, will out last at least four made of com-
mon steel,—and is equally as good for other tools.

AmbroseOsborn,

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The
St. Louis
Directory and Register,: Containing the
Names, Professions, and Residence of
All the Heads of Families and
Persons in Business;
Together with
Descriptive Notes on St. Louis;
The Constitution of the U.United States,
And State of Missouri;
with Other Useful Informaton.
By John A. Paxton,
For several years editor of the Philadelphia Directory
and Register.
St. Louis:


Printed for the Publisher,
Price $ 1.
1821
Table of Contents
List of Contents.
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Advertisements,
Title and List of Contents,
Preface,
Notes on St. Louis,
Manosic Societies,
Erin Benevolent Society,
Counsellors & Attorneys at Law,
Physicians,
Midwives,
List of Streets, &c.
Directions to the Reader,
Post-office, St. Louis,
Names of Inhabitants,
Constitution of the United States.
Constitution of the State of Mis-
souri,
Executive of the State, &c.
Courts and Clerks of Courts,
Officers of the County and Town,
Bank of Missouri,
Fire Companies,
Table of Foreign Coins.

Saint Louis Directory Preface
Preface.
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The Editor on has arrival at St. Louis, found it
very inconvenient to search out the residence of per-
sons with whom he had business; which induced him
to think of publishing a Directory and Register.
to number the houses, and to name those streets not
heretofore named: He made his intentions known to
some of the most influential citizens of the town, who
encouraged him to proceed.—The work is now finish-
ed and it is hoped, will give general satisfaction.—
Every well informed person must be sensibly impres-
sed with the great utility of a work of this nature, in
a town of such importance as that of St. Louis; being
the commercial metropolis of the state and the empo-
rium of the trade of a greater extent of country, than
that of any other place in the western region; and
is, from its convenient situation, destined to become
much the largest town on this side of the Eastern
Mountains.—The labour attendant on the collection of
the necessary information for this undertaking was
very great, more particularly so, as it is the FIRST
publication of the kind attempted in the State of Mis-
souri. It was at first contemplated to insert a digest
of the Ordinances of the Corporation, but on exami-
nation, they proved too voluminous, and the Constitu-
tion of the U.United States has been substituted in their stead
which, it is hoped, will give general satisfaction. In
addition to the names of the inhabitants, will be found
descriptive notes on St. Louis; the Constitution of the
State of Missouri, and a variety of useful information
particularised in the ``List of Contents.'' The reader
is requested to examine the `Directions to the Reader,'
at the commencement of the Names, in order hat every
part may be clearly understood.

The editor takes this opportunity to thank those
gentlemen who so kindly furnished answers to his
many queries, during the time he was engaged in the
callection of information.

Notwithstanding great assiduity and pains have
been used to make the work as complete as possible,

Census.
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no doubt some errors will be found: These, he feels
confident, will be overlooked by an indulgent public.

As the editor has incurred considerable expense in
accomplishing this work, and as it promises so much
convenience and usefulness, to the citizens, he flatters
himself that it will meet with a ready sale. To those
gentlemen who have patronized him, he tenders his
most sincere thanks.

John A.Paxton, .

St. Louis, (Missouri,) May 26, 1821.

The following is a return of the Census, by the U.United
States Marshal, of the inhabitants in the State of
Missouri, on the 1st of August, 1820.

County of St. Louis 9732
St. Genevieve 5048 (including Perry.)*
Wayne 1443
Jefferson 1835
Pike 3747 (including Ralls.)*
Howard 18427 (including Boone,
Chariton and Ray.)*
Montgomery 8074 (ing. Callaway,)*
St. Charles 3990
Lincoln 1662
Franklin 2379 (including Gasconade
Madison 2047
Madrid 2296
Cooper 6959 (including Lillard,
Cole and Saline.*)
Cape Girardean 5965
Washington (say) 3,000
Total 66,607
* Created by the late Legislature since 1st August, 1820

St. Louis Notes Directory
Notes on St. Louis.
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St. Louis, Missouri, is a flourishing incorporated
post town, pleasantly situated on the right bank of
the Mississippi river, 18 miles below the junction of
the Missouri; 190 above the month of Ohio; and about
1200 above New Orleans. It is the seat of justice
for St. Louis county, and is in a township of the same
name. In latitude 38° 39′ N.North and long. 12° 51′ W.West
from Washington City. It is the largest town in the
state, of which it is the commercial metropolis. The
site is elevated and has a decided advantage over any
of the other towns, on account of its being a bold
shore of limestone rocks, which repels the floods:—
Such situations are very rare, as the Mississippi is
almost universally bounded either by high perpendi-
cular rocks or loose alluvial soil, the latter of which
is in continual danger of being washed away by the
annual floods. This spot has an abrupt acclivity from
the river to the first bottom; and a gradual one from
it, to the second; the first bank has a view of the
river and the numerous boats ranged along the shore
and moving on its waters, and is elevated about 40
feet; the second bank is 40 feet higher than the first
bottom, and affords a fine view of the town, river,
and surrounding country. St. Louis, extends nearly
2 miles along the river, and the country around, and
west of it for the distance of 15 miles, is an extended
prairie of a very luxuriant soil, beautifully undulating,
and covered with shrubby oak, and a variety of other
small growth.

St. Louis, was first settled by Mr. Peter De La-
clede Liguest, who had obtained, at New Orleans,
from the French authority, the exclusive privilege of

Notes on St. Louis.
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the Indian trade on the Missouri river. When he
first came in the Illinois country,* there was on the
west bank of the Mississippi river, only the weak
and small settlement of Saint Geneviece; its dis-
tance from the Missouri, was by no means suita-
ble to his views, and he was determined to find a
more convenient situation:—he, therefore visited all
parts of the country and found that the spot on which
the town now stands, was best calculated for his
contemplated purposes, as much by the richness
of the soil as by its short distance by land to the
Missouri, Meramec, and other neighbouring streams,
but principally for the beauty of its elevation,
which undoubtedly, is without a parallel in upper
Louisiana. Mr. De Laclede, considering these advan-
tages, settled himself, and had the first trees felled on
the 15th February, 1764. He frequently told his
friends, that he was commencing the foundation of a
town, which might prove with time, to be one of the
greatest in America. Shortly after the beginning of
this settlement, several inhabitants from Cahokia and
fort Chartres, came and settled themselves. Mr. Do
Laclede, encouraged and protected them against the
Indians, over whom he had great ascendency. These
new settlers, Indians, and Missouri travellers, (boat-
men,) gave to this new settlement, the name of ``La-
clede's village,'' though the latter never would con-
sent to it, and caused it to be in all the official docu-
ments, named ``St. Louis,'' which at length prevailed:
He made choice of this name in honor of Louis, XV
then king of France.

Since this period the progress of civilization and
improvement, is wonderful—It is but about 40 years
since the now flourishing, but yet more promising
state of Missouri, was but a vast wilderness, many of
the inhabitants of this country, yet remembering the

* At this early period, the country on both sides of the Miss is
sippi, was known as Illinois, and was first settled from Canada, by
the way of the lakes, and the Illinois and other rivers.

Notes on St. Louis.
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time when they met together to kill the Buffaloe at
the same place where Mr. Philipson's, On saw and
flour mill is no erected, and on Mill Creek, near to
where Mr. Chouteau's mill now stands—What a pro-
digious change has been operated! St. Louis, is now
ornamented with a great number of brick buildings,
and both the scholar and the courtier could move in a
circle suiting their choice and st..—

By the exertions of the Right Reverend Bishop
Louis William Du Bourg, the inhabitants have seen a
fine brick Cathedral rise, at the same spot where stood
formerly an old log Church, then sufficient, but which
now would scarcely be able to contain the tenth part
of the Catholic congregation; This elegant building
was commenced in 1818, under the superintendance
of Mr. Gabriel Paul, the Architect, and is only in
part completed: as it now stands it is 40 feet front by
135 in depth and 40 feet in height. When completed
it will have a wing on each side, running its whole
length, 22 1-2 feet wide and 25 in height; giving it a
front of 85 feet. It will have a steeple the same height
as the depth of the building, which will be provided
with several large bells expected from France. The
lot on which the Church, College, and other buildings
are erected, embraces a complete square, a part of
which is used as a burial ground. The Cathedral of
Saint Louis, can boast of having no rival in the Unit-
ed States, for the magnificence, the value and ele-
gance of her sacred vases, ornaments and paintings;
and indeed few Churches in Europe possess any
thing superior to it. It is a truly delightful sight to
an American of taste, to find in one of the remotest
towns of the Union a Church decorated with the ori-
ginal paintings of Rubens, Raphael, Guido, Paulo,
Veronze, and a number of others by the first modern
masters of the Italian, French and Flemish schools—
The ancient and precious gold embroideries which the
St. Louis Cathedral possesses, would certainly decorate
any museum in the world. All this is due to the libe-

Notes on St. Louis.
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rality of the Catholics of Europe, who presented
these rich articles to Bishop Du Bourg, on his last
turn through France, Italy, Sicily, and the Nether-
lands. Among the liberal benefactors could be named
many princes and princesses; but we will only insert
the names of Louis XVIII the present King of France
and that of the baronness Le Candele de Ghyseghem,
a Flemish lady to whose munificence, the Cathedral,
is particularly indebted; and who even lately, has
sent it a fine, large and elegant Organ, fit to corres-
pond with the rest of the decorations. The Bishop,
possesses besides, a very elegant and valuable Libra-
ry containing about 8000 volumes, and which is with-
out doubt, the most complete, scientific and literary
repertory of the western country, if not of the west-
ern world. Though it is not public, there is no doubt
but the man of science, the antiquary, and the lin-
guist, will obtain a ready access to it, and find the
Bishop, a man endowed at once with the elegance and
politeness of the courtier; the piety and zeal of the
Apostle, and the learning of a Father of the Church.
Connected with this establishment, is the Saint Louis
College, under the direction of Bishop Du Bourg.—
It is a two story brick building, and has about 65
students, who are taught the Greek, Latin, French,
English, Spanish and Italian languages, Mathema-
tics elementary and transcendent, drawings, &c.—
There are several teachers. Connected with the Col-
lege, is an Ecclesiastical Seminary, at the Barrens in
St. Genevieve county; where Divinity, the Oriental
languages, and Philosophy, are taught.

St. Louis likewise contains 10 common schools; a
brick Baptist Church, 40 feet by 60, built in 1818;
an Episcopal Church of wood; the Methodist con-
gregation hold their meetings in the old court house;
and the Presbyterians in the circuit court room.—In
St. Louis, are the following Mercantile, Professional,
Mechanical, &c. establishments, viz: 46 Mercantile
establishments, which carry on an extensive trade,

Notes on St. Louis.
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with the most distant parts of the Republic, in mer-
chandise, produce, furs and peltry; 3 Auctioneers,
who do considerable business: each pays $200 per
annum to the state, for a license to sell, and on all
personal property sold, is, a state duty of 3 per cent,
on real estate 1 1-2 per cent, and their commission of
5 per cent; 3 weekly newspapers, viz: the ``St. Louis
Inquirer,'' ``Missouri Gazette,'' & ``St. Louis Re-
gister,'' and as many Printing Offices; 1 Book-store;
2 Binderies; 3 large Inns, together with a number of
smaller Taverns & boarding houses; 6 Livery Stables;
57 Grocers and Bottlers; 27 Attorneys and Counsel-
lors at Law; 13 Physicians; 3 Druggists & Apothe-
caries; 3 Midwives; 1 Portrait Painter, who would
do credit to any country; 5 Clock and Watch makers.
Silversmiths and Jewellers; 1 Silver Plater; 1 En-
graver; 1 Brewery, where is manufactured, Beer,
Ale, and Porter, of a quality equal to any in the west-
ern country; 1 Tannery; 3 Soap and Candle Fac-
tories; 2 Brick Yards; 3 Stone Cutters; 14 Brick-
layers and Plasterers; 28 Carpenters; 9 Black-
smiths; 3 Gun smiths; 2 Copper and Tin ware ma-
nufacturers; 6 Cabinet makers; 4 Coach makers and
Wheelwrights; 7 Turners and Chair makers; 3
Saddle and Harness manufacturers; 3 hatters; 12
Tailors; 13 Boot and Shoe manufacturers; 10 Or-
namental, Sign and House Painters and Glaziers; 1
Nail Factory; 4 Hair dressers and perfumers; 2
Confectioners and Cordial distillers; 4 Coopers,
Black, Pump and Mast makers; 4 bakers; 1 Comb
Factory; 1 Bell-man; 5 Billiard-Tables, which pay
an annual tax of $100 each, to the state, and the same
sum to the corporation; several Hacks or pleasure
Carriages, and a considerable number of Drays and
Carts; several professional Musicians, who play at
the Balls, which are very frequent and well attended
by the inhabitants, more particularly the French, who, in general, are remarkably graceful performers, and
much attached to so rational, healthy and improving,

*

Notes on St. Louis.
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an amusement; 2 Potteries, are within a few miles,
and there are several promising gardens in and near
to the town.

By an enumeration taken by the Editor of this
work, in May, 1821, it appears that the town con-
tains the following number of dwelling houses, viz:—
154 of Brick and Stone, and 196 of Wood, in the
North part of the town, and 78 of Brick and Stone,
and 223 of Wood, in the South part; making 232
Brick, &c. and 419 of Wood, and a total of 651.—
There are besides the dwelling houses, a number of
Brick, Stone, and wooden Warehouses, Stables,
Shops and out houses.—Most of the houses are fur-
nished with a garden, some of which are large and
under good cultivation. The large old fashioned
dwellings, erected by the French inhabitants, are
surrounded by a piazza, which renders them very
pleasant, particularly during the heat of summer.—
The ``Steam-Boat-warehouse,'' built by Mr. Josiah
Bright, is a large brick building, and would do credit
to any of the Eastern cities. The Market-house is
well supplied with fish and fowl, good meat and vege-
tables, fruit in its season, and in short every thing
that the country affords, in abundance, at reasonable
prices.

St. Louis was incorporated by the Court of Com-
mon Pleas, at their November term, 1809, when the
country was known as the Territory of Louisiana;
under the following limits, viz:—``Beginning at
Roy's mill on the bank of the Mississippi river,
thence running 60 arpens west, thence south on said
line of sixty arpens in the rear, until the same comes
to the Barriere denoyer, thence the south until it
comes to the Sugar Loaf, thence due east to the Mis-
sissippi, from thence by the Mississippi, along low
water mark, to the place first mentioned.''—The
bounds of the town, as it respects the taxing of the
inhabitants, is confined to the following bounds, viz:
commencing at the mouth of mill creek, (where it

Notes on St. Louis.
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enters the Mississippi river,) thence with the said
creek to the mill-dam, thence with the north arm of
mill creek to the head of the same, thence by a line
running parallel with the Mississippi river, until it
intersects the north boundary of the corporation.

The town is governed by five Trustees, who are
elected on the 6th December annually, by the inha-
bitatus.—There is also a Register whose duty it is to
see that the Ordinances are enforced; an Assessor
and an Inspector of lumber.

The Board of Trustees has passed a number of
very wholesome Ordinances for the establishment and
support of order, all of which, can be seen in the Or-
dinance book, in the office of the Corporation. South
B. street, above Main street, which is open every
morning, Sundays excepted, from 10 to 12 o'clock.

The assessed amount of taxable Property in the
Corporation of St. Louis, for 1821, is about $940-
926, which gives about $3763, tax.

Eight streets run parallel with the river, and are
intersected by twenty-three others at right angles;
three of the preceding, are in the lower part of the
town, and the five others in the upper part. The
streets in the lower part of the town are narrow, be-
ing from 32 to 38 1-2 feet in width; these streets on
``the Hill,'' or upper part, are much wider, ``The
Hill,'' is much the most pleasant and salubrious, and
will no doubt, become the most improved. The
lower end of Market street is well paved, and the
Trustees of the town have passed an Ordinance for
paving the side Walks of Main street, being the se-
cond from and parallel to the river, and the principal
one for business: This is a very wholesome regula-
tion of the Trustees, and is the more necessary as
this and many other streets are sometimes so
extremely muddy as to be rendered almost impas-
sable. It is hoped that the Trustees, will next pave
the middle of Main street, and that they will pro-
ceed gradually, to improve the other streets; which,

Notes on St. Louis.
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will contribute to make the town more healthy, add
to the value of property, and make it a desirable
place of residence. On the Hill, in the centre of the
town is a public square 240 by 300 feet, on which it
is intended to build an elegant Court-House:—The
various courts, are held at present, in buildings ad-
jacent to the Public square. A new stone Jail of two
stories, 70 fect front, by 30 deep, stands west of the
site for the Court-House.

Market street, is in the middle of the town, and is
the line dividing the North part from the South:
Those streets running North from Market street,
have the addition of North to their names, and those
running in the opposite direction, South, for example,
North-Main street, South-Main street, North A.&c.
street, South A. street. The houses were first num-
bered by the publisher of this Directory, in May, 1821.

The fortifications, erected in early times, for the
defence of the place, stand principally on ``the Hill.''
They consist of several circular stone towers, about
15 feet in height, and 20 in diameter, a wooden block
house, and a large stone Bastian, the interior of
which is used as a garden, by Captain A. Wetmore,
of the United States army.

Just above the town are several Indian mounds &
remains of antiquity, which afford an extensive and
most charming view of the towns and beautiful sur-
rounding country, situated in the two states of Mis-
souri and Illinois, which are seperated by the ma-
jestic Mississippi, and which is likewise observed in
the scene as she glides along in all her greatness. Ad-
jacent to the large mound nearest to the town, is the
Mound Garden, belonging to Col.Colonel Elias Rector, and
kept by Mr. James Gray, as a place of entertainment
and recreation: the proprietor has displayed con-
siderable taste in laying it out in beds and walks and
in ornamenting it with flowers and shrubbery—In
short it affords a delightful and pleasant retreat from
the noise, heat and dust of a busy town.

Notes on St. Louis.
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There is a Masonic Hall in which the Grand Lodge
of the state of Misouri, the Royal Arch, and the Mas-
ter masons' Lodges are held. Connected with this
excellent institution, is a burying ground, where poor
Masons are interred at the expense of the Fraternity.
The Council Chamber of Gov.Governor William Clark, where
he gives audience to the Chiefs of the various tribes
of Indians who visit St. Louis, contains probably
the most complete Museum of Indian curiosities, to
be met with any where in the United States; and
the governor is so polite as to permit its being visit-
ed by any person of respectability at any time.

There are two fire engines, with properly organ-
ised companies; one of which is in the North part of
the town, and the other in the South; every dwell-
ing and store has to be provided with good lea-
ther fire buckets.

Mr. Samuel Wiggins, is the proprietor of two ele-
gant and substantial Team-Ferry Boats, that ply re-
gulary and alternately, from the bottom of North H.
street, near the Steam boat Warehouse, to the oppo-
site shore. The great public ability of this mode of
conveying persons & property across the Mississippi
needs no comment, but gives the enterprising owner
of them, a high claim to the patronage of his fellow-
citizens. The River at the ferry is 1 and an 8th
mile in width. Opposite the upper part of the town
and above the ferry, is an island about one mile and
an half in length, containing upwards of 1000 acres:
it belongs to Mr. Samuel Wiggins. A considerable
sand bar has been formed in the river, adjoining the
lower part of the town, which extends far out, and has
thrown the main channel over on the Illinois side;
when the water is low it is entirely dry, and is covered
with an immense quantity of drift wood, nearly suffi-
cient to supply the town with fuel, and only costs the
trouble of cutting and hanling: this is of great conse-
quence to the inhabitants of St. Louis, particularly as
the growth of wood is small in the immediate neigh-

Notes on St. Louis.
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bourhood, on this side of the river. Wood is likewise
brought down the river in large quantities for disposal.

Population in 1810, 1,000; in 1818, 3,500; and at
this time, (1821,) about 5,500,—The town and county
contains 9,732. The population is much mixed,
consisting principally of Americans, from every part
of the Union; the original and other French, of whom
there are 155 families; and foreigners of various na-
tions; consequently the Society is much diversified,
and has no general fixed character:—This, the read-
er will perceive, arises from the situation of the coun-
try in itself new, flourishing, and changing: still that
class who compose the respectable part of the commu-
nity, are hospitable, polite, and well informed—And
here. I must take occasion, in justice to the town and
country, to protest against the many calumies circu-
lated abroad to the prejudice of St. Louis, respecting
the manners, and the disposition of the inhabitants.
Persons meet here with dissimilar habits, of a dif-
ferent education, and possessing various localities.
It, is not therefore surprising, that, in a place, com-
posed of such discordant materials, there should be
occasional differences and difficulties.—But, the rea-
der may be assured, that old-established inhabitants
have little participation in transactions which have so
far so much injured the town.

St. Louis, has grown very rapidly;—there is not,
however, so much improvement going on at this time,
owing to the check caused by the general and univer-
sal pressure that pervades the country.—This state
of things can only be temporary here, for it possesses
such permanent advantages from its local & geogra-
phical situation, that it must, ere some distant day,
become a place of great importance; being more cen-
tral with regard to the whole territory belonging to
the United States, than any other considerable town;
and uniting the advantages of the three great rivers.
Mississippi, Missouri, and Illinois, the trade of which
it is the emporium.

Notes on St. Louis.
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``The Missiouri Fur Company'' was formed by se-
veral gentlemen of St. Louis, in 1819, for the purpose
of trading on the Missouri river and its waters. The
principal establishment of the Company is at Council
Bluffs, yet they have several others of minor conse-
quence several hundred miles above,—and it is ex-
pected that the establishment will be extended shortly
up as high as the Mandan villages. The actual capi-
tal invested in the trade is supposed to amount at this
time, to about $70,000. They have in their employ
exclusive of their partners on the river, 25 clerks and
interpreters, and 70 labouring men.

It is estimated that the annual value of the Indian
trade of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, is $600-
000. The annual amount of imports to this town is stated at upwards of $2,000,000.—The commerce by water, is carried on by a great number of Steam
Boats, Barges, and Keel Boats:—These centre here
after performing the greatest inland voyages, known
in the world. The principal articles of trade are
fur, peltry, and lead. The agricultural productions
are Indian corn, wheat, rye, barley, oats, buck-
wheat, tobacco, and other articles common to the
western country.—Excellent mill stones are found
and made in this country; stone coal is abundant,
and salt petre, & common salt, have been made with-
in a few miles. Within 3 or 4 miles are several
springs of good water, and 7 miles SW.southwest is a Sulphur
Spring. In the vicinity are 2 natural caverns, in
line-stone rocks; 2 miles above town at ``North St.
Louis,'' is a Steam-saw mill; and several com-
mon mills are of the neighbouring streams. The
roads leading from St. Louis are very good, and it is
expected that the Great National Turnpike, leading
from Washington, will strike this place, as the Com-
missioners for the United States have reported in fa-
vor of it.

The American bottom is a very beautiful, rich and
extensive tract on the east side of the Mississippi ex-
tending from the Kaskaskia to within five miles of

Notes on St. Louis.
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the Missouri, being about 90 miles in length by from
2 to 8 in width: opposite to St. Louis it is 7 miles.
The St. Louis market is principally supplied from the
state of Illinois.

The Indian agents and traders, the officers of the
army destined for the upper military posts, and the
surveyors make their outfits at St. Louis, which puts
a great deal of cash into circulation. Here is a Land
office for the sale of the United States' lands in Illi-
nois, Missouri and Arkansaw, a bank with a capital
of $250,000 There is a Theatre of wood, but the
foundation has been laid for a brick one, 40 by 80
feet, which, owing to the present stagnation in busi-
ness, will not be completed very soon. Lumber of
various kinds is brought here from the Gasconade
and other rivers; brick and lime are made; and
stone, sand, and every other material for building,
are abundant. Two stages run from this town; one
to Edwardsville, and the other to Franklin. Colonel
Chouteau's mill dam in the rear of the south part
of the town, is a beautiful sheet of water, affording
plenty of fish and water fowl: it has an outlet to the
Mississippi, below the town.

It is contemplated at some future day to open a
direct intercourse with India by the Missouri and
Columbia rivers. In the course of a few years the
Illinois river will be most probably corrected with
lake Michigan, which will afford incalculable advan-
tages to this place, as it will open a direct water com-
munication, when the New York and Pennsylvania
canals to the lakes are completed, to Montreal, New
York and Philadelphia.

St. Louis is distant from St. Charles 20 miles; Frank-
lin, 130; Carondalet, 6; St. Ferdinand, 15; Hercu-
laneum, 30; St. Genevieve, 60; Potosi, or the lead
mines, 60; Kaskaskia, 65; Edwardsville, 20; Vin-
cennes, 160; Cahokia, 5; Belleville, 18; Alton, 25;
and west from the city of Washington, 982. It is by
water about 650 miles to the Council Bluffs and 1,600
to the Mandan villages.

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[missing figure]

grand lodge of the state of missouri.

Grand Officers, R. W.Thomas, F.Riddick, ,
Grand-Master ;

JamesKennerly, , S.G. Warden ; WilliamBates, . J.
G. Warden ; WilliamRenshaw, , G. Secretary .

ArohibaldGamble, , G. Treasurer .

John W.Honey, , S.G. Deacon ; and,
JohnJones, , J.G. Deacon .

missouri royal arch chapter.

AmosWheeler, , High Priest ; ThompsonDouglass, ,
King ;

AbrahamBeck, , Scribe ; Wm.WilliamWilliam G.Pettus, , Treasurer ;
and Samuel G.I.Decamp, , Secretary .

Meet at the Hall, 1st Thursday preceeding every
full moon.

missouri lodge, no. 12.

EdwardBates, , Master ; J. D.Daggett, , S. Warden ;
JohnWalls, . J. Warden ; P.Haldeman, , Treasurer ;
W. K.Rule, , Secretary ; J. A.Letcher, , S. Deacon ;
ThomasAndrews, , J. Deacon ; JosephWhite, , Steward :
and, John C.Potter, , Tyler .

Meet at the Hall, 1st Tuesday, in every month.

*

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Erin Benevolent Society.

Instituted in 1819, for the purpose of extending re-
lief to distressed Irish Families, who may emigrate
hither and others, whose situation might require pe-
cumary assistance.

*JeremiahConnor, , President ;
ThomasHanly, , Vice-President ;
HughRankin, , Treasurer ; and
DavidGordon, , Secretary .

Stated meetings, 1st Monday in each month.

(*Resigned.)

Counsellors & Attorneys at Law.
Barton, David,
Barton and Bates .
Beck and Spalding ,
Benton, Thomas H.
Block, Eleazer
Brackenridge, Henry M.
Carr, William C.
Conrad, D. H.
Cozens, Horatio
Easton, Rufus,
Farris, Robt.Robert P.
Geyer, Henry S.
Gray & Wright ,
Hempstead, Charles S.
Lawless, Luke E.
Lucas, William
Magenis, Arthur
Perk, James H.
Shurlds, Henry
Strother, George F.
Wash & Carr ,
White, Frederick
Physicians.
Beck, Lewis C.
Carter, . Edward C.
Decamp, Samuel G. I.
Farrar & Walker ,
Fenn, Zeno
Lemignon, Doctor
Gebert, Doctor
Hoffman, H. L.
Lane & Merry ,
Mason, Richard
Villiams, Joseph.
Midwives.
Everhart, Elizabeth
Harden, Jane
Laguaisse, Margaret
Streets Listing
List of Streets, &c.
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Baptist Church , S.W.Southwest corner Market and Third.
Bastian, The—North of Bennet's Hotel .
Cathedral, Roman Church , S.W.Southwest corner Church
and Market.
Clerks' offices , for the various Courts, near the
Public Square.
Constables' office , north Fourth above north C. street.
Court Rooms , near the Public Square.
Episcopal Church , south Church, below south A.
street.
Green-Tree Inn , 85 south Church.
Indian Council Chamber , or Museum of Indiana cu-
riosities, belonging to Governor Clark, 101
north Main.
Jones' Row , north side of Market street, above Third.
Land office , U.United States, west of and near to Bennet's
Hotel.
Mansion House , Bennet's N.E.Northeast corner of north Third
and E. streets.
Market House , south side of Market street, near the
River.
Market street, runs west from the river, between
north and south A. streets—It is the line
which divides the Northern part of the town
from the Southern.
Masonic Hall , in which the Grand, Chapter, and
Master's Lodges, are held: north side south
B. street, above Main.
Methodist Meeting , s. w.southwest corner south Third and
south D. streets.
Missouri Bank , No. 6 north Main street.
Missouri Hotel , s. w.southwest corner north Main and north
H. streets.
Streets, &c.
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Mound Public Garden , The, a pleasant retreat kept
by Mr. Gray, near the Indian Mound.
North A. street, runs west from north Water street,
between Market and north B. streets.
North B. street, runs west from north Water street,
between north A and C. streets.
North C. street, runs west from north Water street,
between north B. and D. streets.
North Church street, runs north from Market street,
between Main and Third streets.
North D. street, runs west from north, Water street,
between north C. and E. streets.
North E. street, runs west from north Water be-
tween north D. and F. streets.
North F. street, runs west from north Water street,
between north E. and G. streets.
North Fifth streets, runs north from Market street,
between north Main and north Third streets.
North Fourth street, runs north from Market street,
between north Third and Fifth streets.
North G. street, runs west from north Water street,
between north F. and H. streets.
North H. street, runs west from north Water street,
between north G. and I. street.
North I. street, runs west from north Water street,
between north H.J. streets.
North J. street, runs west from north Water street,
between north J. and K. streets.
North K. street, runs west from north Water street,
north of J. street.
North Main street, runs north from Market street,
between north Water and Church streets.
North Seventh street, runs north from Market street,
west of north Sixth street.
North Sixth street, runs north from Market street,
between north Fifth and Seventh streets.
North Third street, runs north from Market street,
between north Church and Fourth streets.
Streets, &c.
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North Water street, runs north from Market street,
along the river.
Ox Mill , The, upper end of North Main street,
Post office , north A. street, above north Main street.
Presbyterian Meeting , is held in the Circuit Court
Room.
Prison , The, east side north Sixth street, above
Market street.
Register's office , for the Corporation, south B. street,
above Main.
Sheriff's office , in the Prison.
South A. street, runs west from the river, between
Market and south B. streets.
South B. street, runs west from the river, between
south A. and C. streets.
South C. street, runs west from the river, between
south B. and D. streets.
South D. street, runs west from the river, between
south C. and E. streets.
South E. street, runs west from the river, between
south D. and F. streets.
South F. street, runs west from the river, between
south E. and G. streets.
South G. street, runs west from the river, between
south F. and H. streets.
South H. street, runs west from the river, between
south G. and I. streets.
South I. street, runs west from the river, between
south H. and J. streets.
South J. street, do. do. I. and K
South K. street, do. the river, between
south J. street, and Mill creek.
Steam Boat Landing , above the Team Boat Landing.
St. Louis College , south Church street, below Mark-
et street.
St. Louis Hospital , No. 84 south Church street.
Team-Boat Landing and Ferry , at the bottom of
north H. street.
Theatre , The, 72 north Main street.
**
St. Louis Direction
Directions to the Reader.
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The reader will please to observe the following ge-
neral rule for finding the numbers on Houses:—In
those streets that run north and south, Main street,
for instance, the numbers begin at Market street,
running north and south, the odd being on the east
side; in the cross streets the numbers begin at the
river, the odd being on the north side.

For the names of streets, see ``List of Contests.''

As the pronunciation of a name will often admit
of various modes of spelling it, the reader is request-
ed not to relinquish his search, should he not find it
at the first attempt; but to seek for it under every
possible variet the ear may dictate—d. hdwelling house , stands for
dwelling house; c. h.counting house for counting house; N.North north;
S.south south; E.east east; W.west west; and st.street street.

Where the word street is not expressed it is to be
understood, as north Main—means north Main street;
and south A—means south A street.

post office, st. Louis.

Arrival and Departure of the Mails.

Western,——— arrives Tuesday 2 p. m.
closes Wednesday 8 a. m.
arrives Friday 2 p. m.
closes Saturday 8 a. m.
Shawaneetown,— arrives Tuesday 6 p. m.
closes Tuesday 8 p. m.
Eastern,——— arrives Friday 6 p. m.
closes Friday 8 p. m.
Southern,——— arrives Saturday 6 p. m.
closes Saturday 8 p. m.
Edwardsville,— arrives Wednesday 2 p. m.
closes Wednesday 6 p. m.

eliasrector, , p. m.

St. Louis Paxton's Directory.
Paxton's Directory. ABE-ASH
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A
Abel, Sarah, seamstress , north Fourth, above C
Adams, Henry, carpenter , 89 south Third, below C
Adley, William, drayman , Market, below Third
Alard, L'ange, 67 north Third, above north C
Alexander, Walter B.clerk in the receiver's office—d. h.dwelling house
Bennet's hotel
Alexander, , see Bellessime
Allen, David, grocer , 90 south Main
Alvarez, August, farmer , Market, below Third
Alvarez, Manuel, farmer , Market above Third
Ambroise, Célest, madame , north D above Main
Amelin, Alexis, laborer , south B above Main
Anderson, G.south D above Main
Anderson, Paul, 201 north Main, above north I street
Anduze, rev.reverend Aristides. professor of special mathematics
and director of St. Louis college , south Church below
Market
Armitage, Joshua, merchant , 74 north Main
Armstrong, John, cordwainer , north C street below Main
Arnold James, & co.company merchants, 71 north Main, above
north C
Arnold, Robert, carpenter , 83 south Church, below C
Arnold, William, merchant , 71 north Main, above north C
Ashley, William H.lieutenant governor of the state, south
B, above south Main
Paxton's Directory. ATK-BEL
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Atkinson, Henry, brigadier general in the U. S.United States army ,
99 south Main, s. e.southeast corner south D
Atwood, N. B.druggist, &c. 67 south Main
Bacchus, John, inquire north Water, corner north E
Baker, Ewel, deputy clerk of the circuit court , Market,
above Fifth
Barga, Peter, carpenter , north Church, s. w.southwest corner A
Baribeau, Pierre, 126 north Church, s. w.southwest corner north F
Barr, William, plasterer , 67 south Third, below B
Bartlet, Phineas, carpenter , north Fourth below Third
Bartley, Mary, widow, back of the Steam boat warehouse
Barton & Bates , attorneys and counsellors at law, n. w.northwest
corner Market and Sixth
Barton, Davidcounsellor at law , south Fourth below
Market
Barton, Joshua, attorney at law and secretary of state,
corner Market and Sixth
Bartand, M.carter , 80 north Third
Bates, David G.carpenter , north A, above Church
Bates, Edward, attorney at law, and attorney general
for the state, n. w.northwest corner Market and Sixth
Bates, Nehemiah, bottler , north Third, above north E
Beaugenou, Vital, musician , n. w.northwest corner south Third &
south II
Beck, Abraham, attorney at law, and land agent , s. e.southeast cor-
ner south A and Church streets
Beck, Lewis C.physician , s. e.southeast corner south A & Church
Beck & Spalding , attorneys at law, s. e.southeast corner south A
and Church streets
Becker, Frederick, tailor , 49 north Main, above north B
Beebe, Elijah, saddle and harness manufactures , 8 north
Main
Beebe, Elisha, block and pump maker and cooper south
C, above Church
Belcour, J. B. D.6 south Main, n. w.northwest corner south C
Belfort, Baptiste, south Main, below I street
Bell, John, merchant , 1 north Main, n. e.northeast corner Market
Bell, William, chair maker , south C, above south Main
Bellanger, Charles, carpenter , south Water, below B
Bellissime, Alexander, tavern keeper , 90 south Chuch,
below south C
Paxton's Directory. BEN-BOT
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Benet, Madam, widow 206 north Main
Bennet, William, Mansion house hotel , n. e.northeast corner north
Third and E
Benoit, Catharine S. widow, 118 south Main, north-
west corner E
Benson, William H.printer , 51 south Main
Bent, John, deputy clerk of the county court , over the
county court room
Bent, Silas, clerk of the county court , office over the coun-
ty court room, Market, above Fourth
Benton, Thomas H.attorney at law , north F above Church
bear Bennet's
Berthold, Bartholomew, merchant , 11 north Main
Berthold & Chouteau , fur merchants, 11 north Main
Biddle, major Thomas, of the U.United States' army , 99 south
Main; s. e.southeast corner south D
Bienvenus, Eugene, cabinet maker , south Church below
H.
Billon, Charler, clock and watch maker , 23 north Main,
n. e.northeast corner north A
Bissonnet, Ambroise, north C, above Third
Blair, Daniel, watch marker, &c. 35, south Main
Blanchard, George, keeper of the Green Tree inn , 85
south Church, below C
Block, Eleazer, attorney at law , north Church, n. e.northeast cor-
ner B
Blood, Sullivan, deputy constable , north Fourth, above
north C
Blotnear, Mathias, victualler , 7 Market house—d. h.dwelling house
south Church, below the bridge
Bobb John and William , brick makers, n. e.northeast corner
south Seventh and A
Bompart, François, blacksmith , south D, above Main—
d. h.dwelling house s. e.southeast corner south Third and G
Bompart, Louis, cashier of the Missouri bank , 6 north
Main
Boss Daniel C. & co.company merchants, 68 south Main, below
south B
Bosseron, Charles, blacksmith , 46 north Main, n. w.northwest cor-
ner of north B
Bothick, John, stone mason , 85 north Third, s. e.southeast corner
north D
Paxton's Directory. BOT-BRO
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Bothick, Thomas, grocer , 85 north Third, s. e.southeast corner
north D
Bott, William, painter and glazier , south C, above south
Main
Bouché, François, boatman , 110 south Church below D
Bouis, AndrewVincent , 47 north Main, n. e.northeast corner of
north B
Bouis, Antoine, widow, 47 north Main, n. e.northeast corner north B
Bouju, Joseph, clock and watch maker, silver smith and
jeweller , 76 north Main
Bournes, John, grocer , ``hole in the wall,'' north Water,
below north H
Bowles, Mary, south Church, s. w.southwest corner D
Boyd, Christopher, grocer , 85 north Church, s. e.southeast corner
north D
Boyd, John M.Bennet's hotel , north Third
Boyer, John F.tailor , 24 north Main, n. w.northwest corner of
north A
Brackenridge, Henry M.attorney at law , north B, above
Main
Bradbury, Edward, turner , north Main, above the Brew-
ery
Bradbury, John, potter and farmer , inquire south D, a-
bove main
Bradley, John T.carpenter , north Fifth, above north C
Brady, John, commission merchant , north Water, above
the Team boat ferry
Braud & Detandebaratz , merchants, 25 south Main
n. e.northeast corner south A
Braud, James, merchant , 25 south Main n. e.northeast corner
south A
Brazeau, A.north C east of Main
Brazeau, Louis, 59 north Main, below north C
Brazeau, Nicholas, boatman , south Main, below south I
Bright, Josiah, 54 south Third, s. w.southwest corner south B
Britton, Mrs. widow, 37 south Main
Brown, Mary, widow, back 90 south Main
Brown, Edmund, deputy sheriff , at the office in the jail ,
north Sixth, above Market
Browne, Edward, clerk in the surveyor's office—d. h.dwelling house
Bennet's hotel
Brown, George, carpenter , north A. above Church
Paxton's Directory. BRO-CHO
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Brown, Joseph C.sheriff of the county of St. Louis, of-
fice in the jail , north Sixth, above Market
Brown, William, pump maker , south H, above Third
Burchmore, George, merchant , 76 south Main n. w.northwest
corner south C
Burns, Amariah, bookbinder , south D, above Church
Burns, Michael, grocer , north Water, above north H
CAI-CHO
Caillou, Françols, wheelwright , south Church, below
south J
Caillou, Louis, laborer , south Church, below south K
Callanen, Laurence, baker 169 north Main, n. e.northeast corner
north H
Campbell, John, commission merchant , 2 Steam boat
warehouse—d. h.dwelling house 178 north Main, above north H
Carr, Francis, attorney at law , 123 south Main, s. e.southeast cor-
ner south E
Carr, William C.attorney at law , west of the land office
Carter, Edward C.physician , 32 north Main
Casey, Andrew, cordwainer , 107 south Main, below D
Castor, Daniel, wagon maker , 185 north Main, above
north H
Caufman, Joseph, victualler , north Forth, above G
Cerré, Paschal, south Third, s. w.southwest corner south G
Cerré, Paschal L.2d clerk in the Missouri bank , 6 north
Main
Charless, Joseph, boarding house and livery stable , s. e.southeast
corner Market and Fifth
Charleville, madame J.Baptiste , 111 south Church be-
low D
Cheney, Osborn, hatter , south Church, below F
Chenie, Antoine, 2 north Main n. w.northwest corner of Market
Chouteau, colonel Auguste, 12 south Main, opposite the
Market house
Chouteau, Auguste P.Indian trader , 94 north Main
Chouteau, Paul L.Indian Agent , south-west corner north
Church & C.
ChouteauPeter, jr.junior fur merchant , 11 and d. h.dwelling house 111 north
Main
Paxton's Directory. CHO-COW
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Chouteau, Petersen.124 uorth Main, above north E
Christman, Jonas, hat manufacturer , 10 north Main
Christy, William, register of the land office for St. Leu-
is district, and office
Clark, Michael W.comb maker , south Third below G
Clark, William, late governor , 103 north Main, s. e.southeast cor-
ner north E
Clegg, Joseph, grocer , north Sixth, above north A
Cleland, B.carpenter , north A, above Fifth
Clemmens James, jr.junior & co.company merchants, 17 north Main
Clemont, Francis, stone mason , north A, above Church
Clemorgan, E.hairdresser , 36 north Main
Clinger, Fanny, washerwoman , 110 north Church, above
north E
Codd, James, boarding house , 140 north Main
Collet, Thomas, merchant , 17 south Main
Collier, George, merchant , 19 north Main
Collier John & co.company merchants, 19 north Main
Collins, Roger, tavern keeper , 83 south Church, below
south C
Collins, Martin, tailor , 68 north Chuch, above north C
Collins, Owen, milkman , north Fourth, above north B
Collins, William, carter , north Main, n. e.northeast corner north F
Conklin, James, tailor , north Fourth, above Market
Conn, Edward, victualler , stall 6, market house—d. h.dwelling house
near governor M'Nair's
Conner, Andrew, bottler , 66 north Church, n. w.northwest corner
north C
Conner, Jeremiah, Church , above north B street
Conrad, D. H.attorney at law and clerk of the chancery
court for the 3d district , north side of the public square
above Fourth
Cook, Robert, merchant , inquire at Hanly's , north Wa-
ter, s. w.southwest corner H
Cornelius, Narcis, tavern keeper , north Water, n. w.northwest cor-
ner of F street
Cosgrove, Moses, stone mason , south Church below A
Cotrell, John Milton, carpenter , north Main, near the Ox
mill
Cowan, John, grocer , 93 north Main
Cowie John and William , livery stable, south Third, s. e.southeast corner south A
Paxton's Directory. COX-DEJ
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Cox, Caleb, merchants , 3 north Main
Cozens, Horatio, attorney at law , office 32 south Church — d. h.dwelling house in the rear of 51 south Main, n. e.northeast corner south B
Craig, William, hatter 78 south Church, s. w.southwest corner
south C
Crawford, John, grocer and commission merchant , 1
Market, n. w.northwest corner of Water
Crély, François, carpenter , n. e.northeast corner Market & Third
Crevier, Antoine, near the north bastian, above Bennet's
Crutsinger, Alfred, hatter , 77 north Church, above north
C
Cummins, James C.publisher of the Gazette , 51 south
Main, n. e.northeast corner south B
Cuyler, David C.accountant in the land agency office ,
south A, above main
Cyle, Adam, carpenter , 22 south Third, below Market
Dacres, Dorothy, widow, south B, above Fifth
Daggett & Blair , clock and watch makers, siversmiths,
and jewellers, 35 south Main
Daggett & Haldeman , merchants, 75 north Main, above
north C
Daggett, James H.clock and watch maker, &c. 35, south
Main
Daggett, John D.merchant , 75 north Main
Dangen, Anthony, silversmith and jeweller—d. h.dwelling house 53 and
shop 59 south Main, below south B
Daniels, Aaron, furrier and store keeper , 124 north Main above north E
Darcy, Michael, wagon maker , 79 north Main
Darrow, Zadock, carpenter , north A, above Church
Day, Sarah, boarding house back of the Steam boat ware-
house
Deane, William, merchant , 94 north Main, above D
De Camp, Samuel G. J.physician , office 52—d. h.dwelling house 228
north Main
De Lassus, Charles, formerly governor of Upper Louisi-
ana , near Bent's mill
Delancy, Margaret, 111 south Church, below D
Déjardin, Paulet, tavern keeper , south Main, below south I
*
Paxton's Directory. DEL-DUC
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Delannay, D.56 north main
Delisle, see Bienvenus
Delisle, Francis, baker , south Water, above south B
Delorier, , see Malard
Demoulin, J. Baptiste, widow, north Church, s. w.southwest corner
north A
Derouin, Francis, boatman , south Third below A
Derouin, John, 28 south Third, s. w.southwest corner south A
De Soyres, Louis, merchant , 46 south main
Detandebaratz, Martial, merchant , n. e.northeast corner south
main and south A
De Wint, Lucinda, widow, 64 north main, n. w.northwest corner
north C
Deys, rev.reverend Leo, professor of languages and director of
the St. Louis college , south Church below Market
Dignam, Bernard, cordwainer , 86 north Third, s. w.southwest cor-
ner north D
Didier, Pierre, watch maker and treasurer of the state
of Missouri , n. w.northwest corner south Church and F
Dillon, Lucy, widow, 170 north main, n. w.northwest corner north H
Dillon, Walter, grocer , north Water, below H
Dolan, Dennis, tailor , 66 north Church, n. w.northwest corner
north C
Dolan, Mary, 112, north Church, above north E
Dominé, Baptiste, s. w.southwest corner south Church & E
Douberman, John J.ornamental painter , 42 north main
Dougherty, John, grocer , 107 south Church, below D
Dougherty, Matthew, Drayman , 172 north main
Douglass, Thompson, Justice of the peace , 176 north
Main, above north H street
Doyle, Anthony, labourer , 140 north main
Doyle, Ddward, grocer , 81 north Third, below north D
Droddy, Elizabeth, seamstress , north H street, below
main
Dubourg, Louis William, Right rev.reverend Bishop of Loui-
siana and Floridas, St. Louis College .
Dubrauel, Susan, widow, Church, above north A
Dugan, William, tailor , 92 north main
Duchouquet, François, south church, s. w.southwest corner G
Dichouquet, Pierre, madame, tavernkeeper , 118 south
Church, north-west corner E
Duchouquet, Baptiste, farmer , near Bent's mill
Paxton's Directory. DUM-FAS
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Dumont, , see Gueret
Duncan, Robertsouth Church, near the bridge
Duncan, William, south Main, below F
Dunlavy, Richard, carpenter , south D above Main
Duponts, John, blacksmith , north Water, above north H
Duponts, Peter, baker , 3 market, below Main
Durocher, Auguste, tavernkeeper , 205 north Main
Dutremble, Anthony, 87 north Church, n. e.northeast corner n.north D
Earl, James D.wagon maker , 181 north main, above H
Earl & Light , wagon makers & blacksmiths, 181 north
Main, above H
Easton, Rufus, attorney and counsellor at law , 54 south
Third, south-west corner B
Eckstein, Jacobjr.junior tailor , 12 north Main
Edwards, Elexis, blacksmith , north D, above north Fifth
Edwards & Greer , blacksmith, north D, above Fifth
Elliott, Erasmus Edward, grocer , ``Hole in the Wall,''
north Water, south-west corner H
English, Elkanah, carpenter and boarding house , 78
south Church, south-west corner C.
English, Thomas, carpenter , north of Gov.Governor M'Nair's
Esdale, William, livery stable , south Third, corner A
Essex & Hough , booksellers, stationers & bookbinders,
60 north Main, above north B
Essex, Thomas, bookseller &c. 60 north Main
Estes, Thomas, gentleman , 97 south Main, n. e.northeast corner D
Evans, Joseph, labourer , 206 north Main
Everhart, George, storekeeper , south said market square,
d. h.dwelling house south-east corner south Fourth and I
Everhart, Elizabeth, midwife , south east corner south
Fourth and I
Everson, Henry, baker , market above Main
Faris, Aaron, boarding house , north Third above A
Farrar, B. G.physician , 68 north Main d. h.dwelling house 8 north
Church
Farrar & Walker , physicians, 68 north Main, above C
Fasseau, Peterjr.junior of the U. S.United States army , 104 north Main,
south-west corner E
Paxton's Directory. FEN-GID
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Fenn, Zeno, physician , 39 north Main, above north A
Ferguson, Alexander, merchant , 7 north Main—d. h.dwelling house
south-east corner Fifth and Market
Ferguson, George W.85 south Church
Ferguson, Peter, plasterer and justice of the peace ,
north C, above Fifth
Ferrary, rev.reverend Andreas, professor of ancient languages,
and director of the St. Louis college , south Church
Finney, John, North F, above Fifth
Fitter, William, grocer , 45 north Main, n. e.northeast corner B
Fitzgerald, Michael F.grocer , 77 north Church above C
Fitzsimmons, James, grocer , south church, below F
Flandrin, Antoine, south church, below F
Fleming, Robert, typographer , at the office of the St.
Register
Forsyth, Thomas, Indian Agent , 192 north Main, north-
west corner I
Fouché, Francois, carpenter , north E, above Fifth
Foughlin, John, grocer , north Water, above Team Boat
Ferry
FountaineFelix, labourer , n. e.northeast corner north Third & D
Frame, John, blacksmith , 77 north main—d. h.dwelling house 80 north
Church
Freeman, D. lateinnkeeper , s. w.southwest corner south Third & D
Fry, Jacob, victualler , stall 2 market house—d. h.dwelling house north
Fourth, above C
Gall, Jacob, grocer , north Water north-west corner C
Gamble, Archibald, clerk of the circuit court , for St.
Louis county, Market above Fifth
Garnier, Joseph V.Justice of the peace & Notary Pub-
lic , south A below church—d. h.dwelling house south-east corner
south Seventh and A
Garnieu, Jean Baptiste, boatman , 222 north Main
Gebert, , Doctor south Church, below south F
Gates, , madame of John , south Third, below F
Gay, Agnes, widow, teacher , north Third, above Market
Geyer, Henry S.attorney at law , s. w.southwest corner Market
and Fifth
GiddingsSalmon, rev.reverend teacher , Court House , Market,
above Fourth
Paxton's Directory. GIG-HAM
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Giguere, J.Baptiste , 98 north Church
Gilhuly, Bernard, storekeeper , 44 north Main, corner B
Gilman, Lucinda, widow, 67 north Third, above C.
Girard, Baptiste, south D, below Main
Glinel, Francis, 28 South Third, s. w.southwest corner A
Godair, Antoine, north C, above Sixth
Godair, Baptiste, s. e.southeast corner north D and Fifth
Goddard, T.conveyancer , 57 north Main
Godon, Francois, carter , 110 south Church, below D
Godor, Ann, widow, 141 north Main, above F.
Graham, Richard, Indian Agent , 99 south Main, corner D
Gray, Alexander, counsellor at law , 2 Jones' Row
Gray, James, proprietor of the ``Mound Garden,'' near
the first Indian mound
Gray & Wright , counsellors and attorney at law;
2 Jones' Row
Green, Job W.82 & 85 south Church, below C
Greer, Nathan, blacksmith , north D, above Fifth
Greggs, John, carpenter , 28 south C, above Main
Grimau, Alexander, caulker , south G,s. w.southwest corner south
main
Grimsley & Stark , saddlers & harness manufacturers,
56 south Main
Grimsley, Thornton, saddler &c. 56 south Main
Gueret, Pierre, south Main below G
Guibor, Auguste, north D, above Fourth
Guittar, , see Lagrandeur
Guy, John R, 228 north Main
Guye, Francis, tallow chandler , back of 51 south Main,
in South B
Guyol, Francis M.professor of writing and drawing , in
the St. Louis college , south Church
Guyon, Hubert, merchant , n. w.northwest corner south Church & F
Haldeman, Peter, merchant , 75 north Main, above C.
Hale, Elizabeth, north H, west of Water
Hall, John, tavernkeeper, painter and glazier , 26 south
Third, corner A
Hall, John L. removed to Potosi
Hamann, M.victualler , south Church, near the Bridge,
Stall 4 Market
**
Paxton's Directory. HAM-HOR
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Hammond, Col.Colonel Samuel, 72 south Third, below B
Handley, James, labourer , north Seventh, above Market
Hanlon, James, tallow chandler , north Water, above
Team Boat Ferry
Hanlon & Sparrow , soap and candle manufacturers,
north Water, above Team Boat Ferry
Hanly, Thomas, merchant , north Water, corner north H
Harden, Jane, midwife , 80 north Church
Harding, C.portrait painter , 42 north Main
Harris, Lemenda, widow, north Fourth above G
Harris, Thomas, well digger , corner north Third & B
Harris, William, comb maker , south Third, below G
Harrison, Daniel, cordwainer , 37 south Main
Harvey, E. widow, at Gov.Governor M`Nair's
Hastings, Charles, merchant , 82 south Main
Hawken, Jacob, gunsmith , 214 north Main
Heely, Thomas, chemist, druggist, &c. 6 Jones' Row
Hempstead, Charles S.attorney at law , 85 north Main
south-east corner D, and south A above Main
Hempstead, Lewis, south-east corner north Third and F
Hempstead, Stephen, 21 north main, south-east corner
north A
Hempstead, Thomas, U. S.United States Agent , 8 Steam boat ware-
house, north Water, n. w.northwest corner H.—d. h.dwelling house near Ben-
net's Hotel
Henry Isaac N. & Co. publishers of the St. Louis In-
quirer, 52 north main
Hertzog, Joseph, merchant , 85 north main s. e.southeast corner D
Higgins, Wm.Williamtallow chandler , 29 south church below A
Hill, David B.carpenter , n. w.northwest corner north Third and E
Hinkley, Charles A.bookbinder and pocketbook man-
ufacturer , 118 south main, north-west corner E
Hoffa, John, hairdresser , 27 north main, above north A
Hoffman, David B.merchant , 43 north main, corner B
Hoffman, H. L. (M. D.)druggist and apothecary , 14
north main
Holbrook, John, cordwainer and grocer , 78 & 80 south
main, south-west corner C.
Holly, Margaret, seamstress , 98 south main
Honoré, see Tesson
Horrocks, Edward, baker and boarding house , 14 south C, above main
Paxton's Directory. HOR-JUL
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Horttiz, Jean Baptiste, south Church, below I
Horttiz, Margaret, widow, south Church, n. e.northeast corner J
Hough, Daniel, bookseller &c. 60 north main—d. h.dwelling house
south Third, south-west corner B
Howard, Ann, millenary store , 22 north main, corner A
Howard, William, turner , 114 north Church above E
Howell, Jacob H.merchant , 19 south main
Howlet, Ellen, mrs. of Ryan, north E, above Fifth.
Hughes, David, tavernkeeper , south Church, below J
Hughey, William, labourer , north Church above I
Hunt, Harvey, Bennet's Hotel
Ingram, Arthur, merchant , 17 south main
Irwin, James, carpenter , south C, above Third
Jackson, Samuel, grocer , ``Hole in the Wall,'' north-
Water below H
Jacobs & Blanchard , tavernkeepers, Green Tree Inn ,
85 south Church, and back 86 south main, below C
Jacobs, Leonard, Green Tree Inn , 85 south Church below C
Janes, Joseph, bricklayer , 93 south Third below C.
Janes, William, bricklayer and plasterer , 93 south
Third below C.
January, Thomas . H.commission merchant , 2 Steam
boat warehouse, north Water, north west corner H
Jaques, Benjamin T.watchmaker inquire 82 south main
Jarrett, J. H.Cordwainer , 47 north main
Jennings, Joseph H.carpenter , corner north C and Fifth
Johnston Campbell & James , nail manufacturers, 77
south main, south-east corner south C.
Johnson, Hugh, storekeeper , 35 north main, above A
Johnson, Jeremiah, 42 north main
Johnston, Jonathan, batter , 39 south main
Johnson, Phineas, tavernkeeper , 84 north main above C
Johnson, Thomas, cordwainer , 104 north Church
Johnston, William, carpenter , 88 south Church below C
Jones, John, bricklayer , 10 Jones' Row
Juliemadame , 84 north Third, below D
Paxton's Directory. KEA-LAM
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K
Keating, Timothy, cordwainer , north D, above Church
Keesacker, John grocer, 19 south C, above main
Keese, Absalom, carpenter , north C, above main
Kells, Thomas, labourer , north F, above Fifth
Kelly, Robison, chair maker , 21 south C, above main
Kennedy, John, grocer , 68 north Third above C
Kennedy, William, grocer , ``Hole in the Wall,'' north
Water, below H
Kennerly J. & G. H. merchants, 57 north main, above B
Kerigan, Roger, carpenter , north Third, above E
Kerr, Bell & co.company merchants, I north main, north-east
corner Market
Kerr, John, merchant , I north main, n. e.northeast corner market
Kimble, Dudley, 85 south Church, below south C
Kirker, James, grocer , north Water, above Team Boat
Ferry
Klunk, Joseph, stone cutter, north A above Church
Labadie, Joseph, bellman , south Third below E
Labadie, Silvester, north of the Brewery
Labarge, Joseph, grocer , 20 south Third below Market
Labeaum, P. A.inquire 51 north main
Labross, Sarah, widow, seamstress , south Third below G
Labuche, François, boatman , n. w.northwest corner Main and
south H
Lacroix, Joseph, north C above Third
Lacroze J. J. & co. confectioners and cordial distillers,
27 and 29 south main, below A
Lagrandeur, Louis, 82 south Third, below C
Lagrandeur, Vincent, 77 south Third, s. e.southeast corner C
Laguaisse, Margaret, midwife , 86 north Church s. w.southwest
corner D
Lajoy, see Salé
Lakenan, James, gun smith, &c. 200 north Main—d. h.dwelling house
north Church, above I
Laland, Marie, widow, south Church, below K
Lamb, James, grocer , 91 north Main
Paxton's Directory. LAM-LIN
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Lamy, , see Duchoúquet
Landeville, André, storekeeper , 87 north Main, n. e.northeast cor-
ner D
Lane, Joshua, boarding house , south D, above Main
Lane, M. M.accountant , 66 south Main
Lane & Merry , physicians, 98 south Main, n. w.northwest corner D
Lane, William Carr, physician , 98—d. h.dwelling house 127, south Main
Langham, Elias T.1st clerk in the Missouri bank , 6
north Main
Langham, John S.clerk in the U.United States register's office
near Bennet's
Lardoise, see Vichard
Larned, Benjamin F.Capt.Captain paymaster in the army of the
United States , back 65 north Main, in north C
L'atrisse, Johnboatman , 88 south Third, below C
Laurent, Maurice, teacher of penmanship , 46 south Main
Laveille, Joseph C.carpenter , 16 south C—d. h.dwelling house s. w.southwest
corner Church and south D
Lawless, Luke E.counsellor at law , office n. w.northwest corner
Third and Market—d. h.dwelling house 24 north Main
Lebeau, Francis, carpenter , 100 north Church
Lebeau, Henry, carpenter , s. e.southeast corner north C and Fifth
Leblond, Joseph, 66 north Church, n. w.northwest corner C
Lecomte, madame, widow, 44 south Main
Leconte, J. Baptiste, laborer , 171 north Main, above H
Leduc, M. P.collector of taxes , 34 north Main, above
north A
Lee, Mary, widow of John, Third, above the Bastian
Lee, Patrick, n. e.northeast corner south Church and C
Le Favre, miss P.young ladies academy , 50 south Main
Le Gris, Belisle Pierre, trader , 49 south Main
Leguerrier, Charles, carpenter , 99 north Church
Lemingnon, Doctor , north B, above Main
Lemonde, Louis, carter , 88 north Church
Leroux, Ellen, widow, south B, above Fourth
Levering, Benjamin, plasterer, &c. south church, below
G
Lewis, Fannymrs. of John, south Church below D
Lewis, James O.engraver, &c. 118 south Main
Light, Andrew, wagon maker , 181 north Main, above H
Lindell, Jesse G.merchant , 21 north Main, s. e.southeast corner
north A
Paxton's Directory. LIN-MAY
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Lindell John & co.company merchants, 21 north Main, s. e.southeast cor-
ner north A
Lindell, Peter, merchant , 21 north Main, s. e.southeast corner
north A
Lisa, Mary, widow, 21 north Main, n. e.northeast corner north A
Long, James, carpenter , s. e.southeast corner north C and Fifth
Longdon, ——— 234 north Main
Loper, James, brick layer , 119 south Main, n. e.northeast corner E
Louis, Paul, Indian interpreter , north Water, above A
Lucas, J. B. C. on the St. Charles road ½ mile from St.
Louis
Lucas, William, attorney at law , 1 Jones' row, corner
Market and Fourth
Lycett, John C.silver plater 35 and 118 south Main
Lynch, Timothy, tailor , 40 north main
Macfaden, Mary, south Third, below G
Mackey, James, brick house west of the church street
bridge
Macklin, William, teacher , s. w.southwest corner north G & church
d. h.dwelling house north of the Bastian
Magenis, Arthur, attorney at law , 29 north church, above
north A
Maguire, John, laborer , 182 north main above north H
Malard, H.Indian trader , n. e.northeast corner so.D and church
March, Clement, merchant , 84 south main, below south C
Marly, F. widow, south church, s. e.southeast corner G
Marly, Louis, south church, below G
Marly, Michael, tavern keeper and victualler , south
church, below G, stall 7 market house
MarlyMichael, jr.junior boatman , south church below G
Marsh, Daniel, painter and glaizer , 85 south church
Martin, Charles. copper smith , s. w.southwest corner north D and
church
Martin, John, prefect of the studies , St. Louis college
Mason, Ann, widow, south Third, below south A
Mason, Richard, physician , 37 north main, below B
Massey, David, Missouri hotel , 168 north main, s. w.southwest
corner north H
Mathurin, Jean Beptiste, south church , s. w.southwest corner B
May, James, cordwainer , 57 south main
Paxton's Directory. M'AD-MIL
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M'Adam, James, grocer , 47 north main, above north B
M'Dermott, Louisamrs. of Charles A.south D above
main
M'Donald, Patrick, lumber merchant , s. w.southwest corner church
and north G
M'Ewen, Margaret, 111 church, below D
M'Ginn Bernard and Patrick , victuallers, 11 market
house—d. h.dwelling house south Fifth, below B
M'Girk, Isaac, deputy sheriff , at the jail
M'Guire, Thomas, merchant, and justice of the peace,
42 north main—d. h.dwelling house market, west of Seventh
M'Gunnegle, James, of the U. S.United States army , 201 north main,
above north I
M'Gunnegle, Wilson, 201 north main, above north I
M'Knight, Thomas, commission merchant , north Water,
above Team boat ferry—n. d. 202 north main, above
north I
M'Laughlin, Michael, carter , north H, above main
M'Manus, Edmund, 61 north main, below north C
M'Nair, Alexander, governor of the state of missouri ,
north Third near the first large Indian mound
Menard, Aimable, south D, above south main
Menard, Louis, merchant , 48 south main
Merry, Samuel, physician , 98 south main, n. w.northwest corner
south D
Michau, John A.csbinet maker , south church below, I
Migneron, Louis S.gunsmith , 97 north main, above
north D
Milam, —, merchant , 43 north main, s. e.southeast corner
north B
Milburn, William, clerk in the surveyor general's office
d. h.dwelling house Bennet's hotel
Millagen, Richard, tailor , 33 south main
Millagen & Willi , tailors, shops 52 north & 33 south main
Millaudon, Philip, merchant , 46 south main
Miller, Ellen, millener , south B, above main
Miller, —, carpenter , 128 south main
Moderwell, R.merchant , 65 north main, n. e.northeast corner
north C
Molaire, Baptiste, carter , north Third, above north C
Mills, Nathan, victualler , 85 south church below C
Paxton's Directory. MON-NOI
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Monestes, David, carpenter , north D, above main
Monet, Francis, labourer , 186 north main
Montagne, Joseph, blacksmith , north C above church
Moore, Alfred, turner &c. south Third, below F
Moore, Clarissa, widow, 77 south main, s. e.southeast corner C.
Moore, —carpenter , 128, south main
Moore, Daniel S. D.deputy clerk circuit court , market
above Fifth
Moore, Daniel, bacon store , 53 north main above B
Moore, James, carpenter , north Church, corner north I
Moore, Nimrod H.south Church, above south C.
Morin, Baptiste, boatman , south church, n. w.northwest corner K
Morin, Joseph, boatman , south Third, below south J
Morin, , widow of Anthony, south church, corner H
Morrison, John, printer , 51 south main
Morton, George, carpenter , south church, below south G
Morton, Morgan, carpenter , south B above main
Mount, Samuel, coach maker , north D, above Fifth
Mullett, Frederick, south-east corner main and south F
Mulligan, Eliza, widow, near the Bastian
Mullin, James, labourer , 84 south church
Murphey, Matthew, brewer , at Brew house , north main
Murphy, James, south Third, below F
Murphy, Thomas, 210 north main
Nagle, James, storekeeper , 35 north main
Nagle & Johnson , store keepers, 35 north main, above A
Nash, Hiram, boatman , 20 south Third, below market
Neal & Liggett , copper and tin ware manufacturers,
54 south main, south-west corner south B
Neil, Reverend, Francis, principal of the St. Louis col-
lege, and curate of the Cathedral
Nevitt, Joseph, boarding house , 65 south Third, below B
Newell, Ambrose, blacksmith , north Third, opposite the Bastian
Newell, Richard W.43 north main, south-east corner B
Newman, Hannah, widow, north Third, above north B
Nicholson, John, carpenter and builder , 88 south main,
below south C
Noise, Maria, widow, n. w.northwest corner main and south F
Paxton's Directory. OBE-PAU
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O.
Obersamuel, R.merchant , 84 south, Main below C
O'Fallon, John, adjutant general of the state of Mis-
souri —d. h.dwelling house N. W.northwest of the Land office.
O'Hare, Mary, widow, south D, above Main
O'Heeley, H. F.merchant , 23 north Main n. e.northeast
corner north A
O'Rourk, John, grocer , 91 north Main, above north D
Orr, William, printer, and publisher of the St. Louis
Register , south A. above south Main
Osborn, Ambrose, blacksmith , north Water, above
north G—d. h.dwelling house hill, near the north Bastan
O'Fool, James, labourer , north E. above Fifth
Paddock, Gaius, boarding house , 24 north Main,
n. w.northwest corner north A.
Page, Daniel D.baker , 81 south Main
Papin, Joseph, grocer south west corner north Third &
north E.
Papin, Laforce, Indian Trader , 90 north main, above
north D.
Papin, Leber, blacksmith , 84 north Main, above A
Papin, Villeray, blacksmith , 84 north Main
above A.
Parizien, Victor, boatman , 22 south Third, below
Market
Park, Mrs. widow, south D. above main.
Parks, Arthur, south Church below south J.
Parmele, Sylvanus, musician , 85 south Church
Paul, Gabriel, auctioneer and commission merchant ,
73 north Main above north C.
Paul and Ingram , merchants, 17 south Main, first
house below the market
Paul, Nathan, merchant , 17 south Main
Paul, René, 65 north Main, n. e.northeast corner north C.
Paxton's Directory. PAX-PRO
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Paxton, John A.inquire 60 north Main street
Payne, Nathaniel D.coach driver , south Church, be-
low south I
Peck, James H.attorney at law , south Fourth, below
market
Pell, Jonathan, drayman , 128 south Main, below E
Peltier, madame , widow, 118 south Main corner E.
Pendleton, Joseph, student of medicine , s. w.southwest corner
Third and south D
Pendleton, Zebalon, teacher , do do
Perras, James, south Church, above south C
Peters, Thomasboatman , south Church below south G
Peterson, Henry, labourer , south F above Church
Petit, Louis, south Third n. w.northwest corner south G
Philibert, Gabriel, tavern keeper , north Water, n. w.northwest
corner F
Philibert, Joseph, 135 north Main n. e.northeast corner north F
Philipson, Joseph, merchant , 56 north Main
Pierre, , see Duchouquet
Pitzer, George, north Third, above north A.
Pocock, Henry, ornamental painter south A. above
south Main
Porter, Joseph, cabinet maker , north C. above main
Potter, John C.lumber master and Tyler to the ma-
sonic lodge , office north Water cornor of north E.
d. h.dwelling house 83 north Church
Powers, James, Market above Main
Pratte, Bernad, merchant 7 north Main, above Mar-
ket
Price, Christopher, 12 south Third below Marke
Price, Risden H.north Church n. w.northwest corner B
Primau, Paul, north Third above north B.
Primm, Peter, tailor , 45 south Main—d hdwelling house south B. a-
bove church
Provanche, John Louis, N Enortheast cornor north B. and-
Church
Provanchere, Psouth Church, west side, above the
Bridge
Paxton's Directory. PUR-REY
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Purden, Francis, drayman south church near Bridge
Purdy, James J.carpenter , north A. above Church
Q.
Quigley, Daniel, victualler , stall 10 market
house—d. h.dwelling house south Fifth street, below B.
R.
Ramsay, James, grocer , north Third, above
north E.
Ranken, Hugh, 25 north Main, above north A
Ranken, Robert, merchant , 25 north Main, above
north A.
Rankin John & Samuel , tanners and curriers, south
F above Main
Rawlings, Margaret, mantua maker , 9 Jones' row
Reams, John, tailor , 85 south Church, below C
Rector, colonel Elias, post master , office north A above
Main—d. h.dwelling house north Third on the hill above Bequet's
Rector, Stephen, surveysor , n. e.northeast corner, south C. and
Church
Rector, general William, surveyor of the U.United States
lands in Illinois, Missouri, and Arkansaw , ofice
west of Bennet's
Regis, Vasseur, N. 78 south Third, s. w.southwest corner C.
Reed, mrsChloe, widow of captain Jacob , south D.
above Fifth
Regnier, Francis, teacher of French , south Church,
NW.northwest corner south F
Reilly, Robert, porter-house , 9 south C. above Main
Renard, Hyacinthe, north Main, near the Ox mill.
Renshaw, Wm.Williammerchant , 52 south Third, NW.northwest corner
B.
Reynolds, Fabritius, 82 and 85, south Church, below
C.
Paxton's Directory. REY-RUP
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Reynolds, Obediah, stone-mason , 150 north Main, s. w.southwest
corner north G.
Rice, Edward, labourer , north C, above north Church
Richard, Eulalie, south Church, below south F.
Richards, Jane, widow, boarding-house , 43 north Main
s. e.southeast corner north B.
Riddick, Thomas F.president of the Missouri bank
south Fourth, below south F
Riloy, —, victualler , stall 9 market-house
Riviere, Philip, Madame , south Church, below F
Robb, George H.merchant , 153 north Main, n. e.northeast
corner north G
Roberts, Michael, cordwainer , 141 north Main, above
north F
Roberts, Thomas, victualler , n. w.northwest of the Bastian-
stall-market-house
Robidoux Joseph and Francis , merchants, 71 and 73
south Main n. e.northeast corner, north C.
Robinson, Richard, 218 north Main
Rockeblave, Philip, carpenter and justice of the peace ,
26 south C. above Main
Rockford, Francis, teacher , north E. above Fifth
Rogers, —, farmer , near Bent's mill
Rollet, Michel, 100 south Main corner D
Rollins, Henry, cordwainer , south D. above Church
Rollons, Miles, drayman , north Fourth above G
Rosegrant, John Allen, carpenter , 98 south Main, N.
W. corner south D.
Ross, Charles, R 64 north Main, s. w.southwest corner C.
Rowcount, Anthony, wheelwriht , back 214 north
Main
Roy, Lewis, victualler , 208 north Main-stall 5 mar-
ket-house
Royard, —, farmer , south Third below D
Rule, William K.merchant , 72 and d. h.dwelling house 68 north
Church
Rupley, Jacob, carpenter , 16 south C—d. h.dwelling house S. W.southwest
corner south Church and D.
Paxton's Directory. RUS-SEW
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Rusself, Jesse D.sign and ornamental painter , 17
south C above Main
Russell, John, potter , 17 south C. above Main
Russell, John S.turner and chair maker , 17 south C.
above Main
S.
Sale, Jeansouth Third, below south G.
Sale, Lambert, south Third n. w.northwest corner south I.
Salois, Joseph, 81 north Third, above north C.
Samuel Giles M. and co.company merchants, 65 north Main
n. e.northeast corner north C.
Sanguinet, Marie Anne, widow, 49 south Main
Sanguinet, Simon, south Church, s. w.southwest corner S. Esoutheast
Sarpy, G.merchant , 31 north Main, above north A
Sarpy, John B.merchant , 11, & d. h.dwelling house 31, north Main.
Sarrade, John, confectioner, and cordial distiller , 54
North Main
Saugrain, Madame, widow, SW.southwest corner South Church
and J
Saulnier, Michael G.professor of languages , St. Louis
College
Savage, William H.auctioneer and commission mer-
chant , 66 south main, below south B.
Scaveuer, Joseph, carpenter , south Third, SW.southwest corner
E.
Schatler, David, victualler , stall 3 market house
Schewe, Christopher Frederick, painter and glazier ,
south Church, above C.
Scollin, John, grocer , north Water, N W.northwest corner C.
Scott, Alexander, merchant , 72 north Church
Scott, Moses, justice of the peace , south B. above Fourth
Scott & Rule , merchants, 72 north Church above north
C
Seward, Benjamin J, merchant , south C.SW.southwest corner
Fourth
Paxton's Directory. SEW-SMI
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Seward & Collett , merchants, 17 south Main
Seymour, Nathan, tailor , south A. above Main
Shackford, John & co.company merchants, 58 south Main, d. h.dwelling house Market, west of Fifth
Shannon, Mary, widow, 20 south C. above Main
Shehan, David, victualler , 9 Market house
Shepherd, David, bricklayer , 86 north Church, SW.southwest
corner north D
Shidley, David, victualler , north Fourth above C.
Shidley and Fry , victuallers, north Fourth, above
north C
Shurlds, Henry, attorney at law , office, NE.northeast corner
north Church, and North B—d. h.dwelling house 37, north Main
SimondsJohn, senr.senior painter & glazier , north Fourth
above north C
SimondsJohn, junr.junior deputy constable , north Fourth
above north C
Simonds, mrs. widow, 77 north Church
Simoreau, John B.labourer , south B. above Church
Skerkey, mrs. of Wm.William 24, south C. above Main
Skinner Alfred & co.company grocers, 82 south Church, below
south C.
Skinner, mrs.boarding house , 42 north Main
Smith & Dougherty , grocers, 107 south Church, be-
low D.
Smith, Eliza, widow, gentlewoman , 7 north Main,
above Market
Smith and Ferguson , merchants, 7 north Main, above
Market
Smith, Frederick, hair dresser , 61 south Main
Smith, Jesse, accountant , 82 south Church, below
south C
Smith, J.J.jr.junior & co.company wholesale and retail druggists
and apothecaries, 67 south Main, below south B
Smith, John B.N.farmer , 3 miles SW.southwest of the bridge
Paxton's Directory. SMI-STR
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Smith, John, merchant , 7 north Main, d. h.dwelling house NW.northwest
corner south Fourth and south A.
Smith, John. grocer , 107, south Church below D.
Smith, Mary, 81 north Church
Smith, O. C.merchant , 1 Steam boat warehouse, north
water, NW.northwest corner H—d. h.dwelling house south C. above Third.
Smith, Samuel, professor of Languages , Saint Louis
College
Smith, Samuel, carpenter , Market below Third
Smith, Thomas F.captain , of U. S.United States army , 99 s.south Main
Smith and Wordingham , livery stable keepers and
Farriers, north Fourth above Market.
Snow, mrs.teacher of females , 42 north main
Soulard, Antoine, farmer , below the Bridge, Church
street
Soy, Patrick, grocer , North Water, above north H
Spalding, Josiah, Attorney at Law , south A.SE.southeast cor-
ner Church
Sparks, Sarah, widow, south Third, NW.northwest corner E.
Sparrow, Wm.William H.tallow chandler , north Water, a-
bove Team boat Ferry
Spencer, Harlow, cabinet maker , 6 Jones' Row, Mar-
ket street
Spencer Harlow & James P. cabinet & chair makers,
87 south Main, below south C.
Stafford, John, cordwainer , south B. above Main
Stall, Martin, victualler , stall 5 market house, d. h.dwelling house
near Governor M`Nair's.
Stark, William, saddler, &c. 56, south Main
Stebbins, Samuel. cordwainer , 68, north Main
Stewart, Elizabeth, seamstress , south B. above Main
Stewart, Wm.William128, south Main, below E
Stokes, Wm.Williamfarmer , about 2 miles west of the Jail
Strother, George F.attorney at law, and receiver of
Public monies , for St. Louis land district —d. h.dwelling house
NW.northwest corner north Sixth and north C
Paxton's Directory. SUL-TRU
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Sullivan, —, drayman , above governor M`Nair's
Sullivan, H.labourer , 104 north Church
Sullivan, Patrick, professor of Ancient Languages , St.
Louis college
Sullivan, Wm.Williamjustice of the peace , office 38 north
Main, NW.northwest corner north D.— d. h.dwelling house SW.southwest corner
south A and Fourth
Sutton, Aaron, cabinet marker , 1 south C. below Main
Sutton, John L.blacksmith , 94 south Church below C.
T
Taliaferre, Lawrence, Indian agent at St. Peters ,
north C. back 65, north Main
Taylor & Baradbury , potters, south D. above Main
Taylor, John, potter, &c. south D. above Main
Tellier, Amant, madame , 91 south Main
Tesson, Louis, widow NE.northeast corner of north F and
Church
Tesson Michael and Francis , merchants, 43 and d. b.
48 south Main
Thibeau, Alexis, boatman , south D. below Main
Thoburn, James, merchant , 86 north main, SW.southwest corn-
er north D.
Tholozan, John Eli, 49 south Main
Thornton, John, grocer , 65 north Third, NE.northeast corner
north C.
Thornton, Nichols, cooper , 66 north Third, NW.northwest
corner North C.
Tillton, William P.accountant , 66 south Main
Tobin, Bartholomew, labourer , 106 north Church,
corner E.
Tracy, Edward, merchant , store 4, and d. h.dwelling house 43 north
Main
Tracy and Wahrendorff , merchants, 4 north Main,
above Market
Tranor, Michael, labourer , north Fourth, above G.
Trudeau, Baptiste, teacher , north B, above Main.
Paxton's Directory. VAC-WET
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Vachard, C.south Third n. e.northeast corner E.
Valois, Erancoissouth b. above Main
Vachard, Jcarpenter south Third, below F.
Varner, Jacob, grocer 28 south C. above Main
Vasquez, Hipolitte, 210 north Main
Vasquez, Joseph210 north Main
Verdin, Nicholas, carpenter s. e.southeast corner north C
and Fifth
Vincent, , see Bouis
Von Phul, Henry, merchant , 13 north Main—d—h
north Water above Market
W
Waddle Henry, & James Ramsay , grocers
north Third above north E
Wahrendorff, Charles, merchant , store 4 & d hdwelling house 43
north Main
Walker, David V.physician , office 68 north Main—
d. h.dwelling house on the hill opposite the Bastian
Walker, rev.reverend Jesse, south Third, below D.
Walker, Johndeputy sheriff at the Jail
Wallace Howel & Cocompany merchants 19 south Main, below
the market
Wallace, James B.merchant 19 south Main
Walsh, Hester, grocer 70 south Main
Walsh, P.auctioneer and commission merchant , 29
north Main
Ward, rev.reverend Dr.rector of the episcopal Church , south
Fourth, below F.
Ward, Amos, cordwianer , south D above Church
Ward & Rollins , cord wainers 38 north Main
Wash & Carr attorneys at law 123 south Main, S. Esoutheast
cornor of south E.
Wash, Robert, attorney at law , 123 south Main, d hdwelling house
on the hill, n. w.northwest of the Bastian
Warner, Jabez, constable of St. Louis township , north
Fourth above north C.
Watt, James, grocer , south Third below A.
Wetmore, Alphonse'pay master in the U. S.United States army ,
north Third opposite the Bastian
Paxton's Directory. WHE-YOU
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Wheeler, Asa, baker 31 south Main
Wheeler & Page , bakers and grocers, 91 south Main
Wherry, Macky, register for the corporation , office
south B. above Main—d. h.dwelling house 124 south Main
White, Frederick, attorney at law and Notary public
97 south Main n. e.northeast cornor of south D.
White, Joseph, hatter 39 south Main
White, Isaac W.victualler , south Third below south G
White, Seth, cordwainer , 57 south Main
Wiggins, Samuel, proprietor of the Team Ferry boats ,
4 Steam Boat ware house—d. h.dwelling house 164 north Main
Wiggins, StephenR—exchange broker , 4 Steam Boat
warehouse—d. h.dwelling house 164 north Main
Willi, Samuel, Tailor 52 north Main
Williams, Joseph, physician , north B. above Main
Wilson, Abel, clerk in constables' office , north Fourth
above C.
Wilson, Moses E.teacher , north Third above the north
Bastian—d. h.dwelling house 42 north Main
Wolford, Ann, widow, 83 south Main
Wonderly, David, victualler , stall 8 market house—d. h.dwelling house south Church, below the Bridge
Wordingham, William, livery stable keeper , north
Fourth above Market.
Wright, B. D.attorney at law , 2 Jones' Row, Mar-
ket Street.
Wright, John J.boarding house , 137 north Main, N.
E. cornor of north F.
Y.
Yale, Henry, painter &c. 17 south C. above Main
Yard, Jacob, tavernkeeper , Columbian Inn. 82 south
Main
Yard, Joseph, cabinet maker , 56 north and 119 south
Main
Yosty, Emilian, widow 82 north Main
Young, Benjamin, baker and grocer , 81 south Main
Constitution of the U.S.A.
The
Constitution
of the
United States of America.
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The constitution framed for the Unìted States of
America, by a Convention of Deputies from the States
of New Hampshire, Massachussetis, Connecticut, New
York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Mary-
land, Virginia. North Carolina, South Carolina, and
Georgia, at a session begun May 25, and ended Sep- tember 17. 1787.

We, the People of the United States, in order to form a more
perfect union, establish justice, ensure domestic tranquility, provide
for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure
the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and
establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Article I.—Section I.

All legislative powers herein granted, shall be vested in a Con-
gress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House
of Representatives.

Section II.

1. The House of Representatives shall consist of members chosen
every second year, by the people of the several states, and the elec-
tors in each state, shall have the qualifications requisite for electors
of the most numerous branch of the state Legislature.

2. No person shall be a representative who shall not have attain-
ed to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen o the United States; and who shall not, when elected, be an inhab-
of that state in which he shall be chosen.

United States
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3. Representatives and direct taxes, shall be apportioned among
the several states, which may be included within this union, accord-
ing to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding
to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service
for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of
all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made within
three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the U.United States;
and within every subsequent term of ten years, in such manner as
they shall by law direct. The number of representatives shall not
exceed one for every thirty thousand: but each state shall have at
least one representative - and until such enumeration shall be made,
the state of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose three; Mas-
sachusetts eight; Rhode Island and Providence plantations ene;
Connecticut five; New York six; New Jersey four; Pennsylvania
eight; Delaware one; Maryland six; Virginia ten; North Carolina
five; South Carolina five; and Georgia three.

4. When vacancies happen in the representation from any state,
the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of electioas to fill
such vacancies.

5. The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and
other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment.

Section III.

1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two se-
nators from each state, chosen by the legislature thereof, for six
years: and each senator shall have one vote.

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled, in consequence of
the first election, they shall be divided, as equally as may be, into
three classes. The seats of the senators of the first class shall be va-
cated at the expiration of the second year; of the second class, at the
expiration of the fourth year; and of the third class at the expiration
of the sixth year: so that one-third may be chosen every second
year. And if vacancies happen, by resignation or otherwise, during
the recess of the legislature of any state, the executive thereof may
make temporary appointments until the next meeting of the legisla-
ture, which shall then fill such vacancies.

3. No person shall be a senator, who shall not have attained to
the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United
States; and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that
state for which he shall be chosen

4. The Vice-President of the United States shall be President of
the Senate; but shall have no vote unless they be equally divided.

5. The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a Presi-
dent pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or when he
shall exercise the office of President of the United States.

6. The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments.
When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation.
When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief-Justice
shall preside, and no person shall be convicted, without the concur-
rence of two-thirds of the members present.

7. Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend further
than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy
any office of honour, trust, or profit, under the United States. But

Constitution.
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the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be liable and subject to in-
dictment, trial, judgment and punishment according to law.

Section IV.

1. The times, places, and manner of holding elections for sena-
tors and representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the le-
gislature thereof: but the Congress may, at any time, by law, make
or alter such regulations, except as to the places of choosing se-
nators.

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year; and
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they
shall by law appoint a different day.

Section V.

1. Each House shall be the judge of the elections, returns and
qualifications of its own members; and a majority of each shall con-
stitute a quorum to do business but a smaller number may adjourn
from day to day, and may be authorised to compel the attendance
of absent members, in such manner, and under such penalties as
each House may provide.

2. Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings;
punish its members for disorderly behaviour; and with the concur-
rence of two-thirds, expel a member,

3. Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings; and from
time to time, publish the same, excepting such paris as may in their
judgment require secrecy; and the yeas nays of the members of
either House, on any question, shall, at the desire of one-fifth of
those present, be entered on the journal.

4. Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, without
the consent of the other adjourn for more than three days, nor to
any other place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.

Section VI.

1. The senators and representatives shall receive a compensation
for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid out of the trea-
sury of the United States. They shall, in all cases, except treason,
felony, and breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest, during
their attendance at the session of their respective House, and in
going to, or returning from the same; and for any speech or de-
bate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other
place.

2. No senator or representative shall, during the time for which he
was elected, be appointed to any civil office, under the authority of
the United States, which shall have been created, or the emoluments
whereof shall have been increased, during such time; and no per-
son, holding any office under the United States, shall be a member
of either House, during his continuance in office.

Section VII.

1. All bills, for raising revenue, shall originate in the House of
Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with a-
mendments, as on other bills.

2. Every bill, which shall have passed the House of Representa-
tives and the Senate; shall, before it become a law, be presented to
the President of the United States. If he approve, he shall sign it;

United States.
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but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to that House, in
which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections at large
on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If, after such recon-
sideration, two-thirds of that House shall agree to pass the bill, it
shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other House, by
which it shall likewise be reconsidered: and, if approved by two-
thirds of that House, it shall become a law. But, in all such cases,
the votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and nays;
and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill, shall be
entered on the journal of each House respectively. If any bill shall
not be returned by the President, within ten days (Sundays except-
ed) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law
in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress, by their
adjournment, prevent its return; in which case it shall not be a law.

3. Every order, resolution, or vote, to which he concurrence of
the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except
on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to the President of
the United States; and, before the same shall take effect, be approv-
ed by him; or, being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two-
thirds of both Houses, according to the rules and limitations pre-
scribed in the case of a bill.

Section VIII.

The Congress shall have power—

1. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, to pay
the debts, and provide for the common defence, and general welfare
of the United States; but all duties, imposts, and excises, shall be
uniform throughout the United States.

2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States.

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the
several states, and with the Indian tribes.

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform
laws on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout the United States.

5 To coin money; regulate the value thereof, and of foreign
coin; and fix the standard of weights and measures.

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities
and current coin of the United States.

7. To establish post offices and post roads.

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by secu-
ring for limited times, to authors and inventors, the exclusive right
to their respective writings and discoveries.

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court.

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the
high seas, and offences against the law of nations.

11. To declare war; grant letters of marque and reprisal; and
make rules concerning captures on land and water.

12. To raise and support armies. But no appropriation of money
for that use, shall be for a longer term than two years.

13. To provide and maintain a navy.

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of the land
and navel forces.

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws
of the union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions.

Constitution.
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16. To provide for organizing arming, and disciplining the mili-
tia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the
service of the United States; reserving to the states respectively the
appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia
according to the discipline prescribed by Congress.

17. To exercise exclusive legislation, in all cases whatsoever,
over such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by ces-
sion of particular states, and the acceptance of Congress, become the
seat of the government of the United States; and to exercise like
authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature
of the state in which the same shall be, for the erection of sorts, ma-
gazines, arsenals, dock yards, and other needful buildings; and

18. To make all laws, which shall be necessary and proper for
carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers
vested by this Constitution in the government of the United States,
or in any department or officer thereof.

Section IX.

1. The migration or importation of such persons, as any of the
states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited
by the Congress, prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and
eight; but a tax on duty may be imposed on such importation, not
exceeding ten dollars for each person.

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspend-
ed, unless when, in cases of rebellion or invasion, the public safety
may require it.

3. No bill of attainder or ex-post facto law shall be passed.

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in pro-
portion to the census or enumeration herein before directed to be
taken.

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any
state. No preference shall be given, by any regulation of commerce
or revenue, to the ports of one state, overthose of another; nor shall
vessels, bound to or from one state, be obliged to enter, clear or pay
duties in another.

6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in conse-
quence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and
account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be
published from time to time.

7. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States; and
no person, holding any office of profit or trust under them shall,
without the consent of Congress, accept of any present, emolument
office or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or fo-
reign state.

Section X.

1. No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance or confederation;
grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emil bills of cre-
dit: make any thing but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of
debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex-post facto law, or law impairing
the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility.

2. No state shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any im-
posts or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely

United States'
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necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net produce of
all duties and imposts laid by any state on imports or exports, shall be
for the use of the treasury of the United States; and all such laws
shall be subject to the revision and controul of the Congress. No
state shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty on ton-
nage, keep troops, or ships of war, in time of peace, enter into any
agreement or compact with another state, or with a foreign power,
or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent dan-
ger as will not admit of delay.

Article II.—Section I.

1. The executive power shall be vested in the President of the
United States of America. He shall hold his office during the term
of four years, and, together with the Vice-President, chosen for the
same term, be elected as follows;

2. Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature
thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole num-
ber of senators and representatives, to which the state may be en-
titled in the Congress But no senator, or representative, or person
holding any office of trust or profit, under the United States, shall be
appointed an elector

3. The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by
ballot for two persons, of whom one, at least, shall not be an inhabi-
tant of the same state with themselves And they shall make a list
of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for each;
which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat
of the government of the United States, directed to the President of
the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the presence of
the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates,
and the votes shall then be counted The person having the great-
est number of votes shall be the President, if such number be a ma-
jority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if there be
more than one who have such majority, and have an equal number
of votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately choose
by ballot one of them for President: and if no person have a ma-
jority, then, from the five highest on the list, the said House shall in
like manner choose the President. But in choosing the President,
the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state
having one vote: a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a mem-
ber or members from two-thirds of the states: and a majority of all
the state shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after the
choice of the President, the person having the greatest number of
votes of the electors, shall be the Vice-President But if there
should remain two or more, who have equal votes, the Senate shall
choose from them by ballot, the Vice President.

4 The Congress may determine the time of choosing the elec-
tors, and the day on which they shall give their votes; which day
shall be the same throughout the United States.

5 No person, except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the
United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall
be eligible to the office of President. Neither shall any person be
eligible to that office, who shall not have attained to the age of thirty
five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the U.United States.

Constitution.
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6. In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his
death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties
of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice-President; and
the Congress may, law, provide for the case of removal, death,
resignation, or inability, both of the President and Vice-Present,
declaring what officer
shall then act as President; and such officer
shall act accordingly, until the disability be removed, or a President
shall be elected.

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his service,
a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished,
during the period for which he shall have been elected; and he shall
not receive, within that period, any other emolument from the Uni-
ted States, or any of them.

8. Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take
the following oath or affirmation.

``I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the
office of President of the United States; and will, to the best of my
ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United
States.''

Section II.

1. The President shall be commander in chief of the army and
navy of the United States, and of the militia of the several states,
when called into the actual service of the United States. He may
require the opinion, in writing, of the principal officers in each of
their respective offices; and he shall have power to grant reprieves,
and pardons, for offences against the United States, except in cases
of impeachment.

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of
the Senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the senators
present concur: and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice
and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public
ministers and consuls, judges of the supreme court, and all other of-
ficers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein other-
wise provided for, and which shall be established by law. But the
Congress may, by law, vest the appointment of such inferior officers,
as they think proper, in the President alone, in the courts of law or
in the heads of departments.

3. The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that
may happen, during the recess of the Senate, by granting commis-
sions, which shall expire at the end of their next session.

Section III.

He shall, from time to time, give to the Congress information of
the state of the union; and recommend to their consideration such
measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient. He may on
extraordinary occasions, convene both Houses or either of them;
and, in case of disagreement between them, with respect to the
time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time as he shall
think proper. He shall receive ambassadors and other public minis-
ters. He shall take care that the laws he faithfully executed; and
shall commission all the officers of the United States.

**

United States'
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Section IV.

The President, Vice-President, and all civil officers of the United
States, shall be removed from office, on impeachment for, and con-
viction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors

Article III—section I.

The judicial power of the United States shall be vested in one su-
preme court, and in such inferior courts, as the Congress may, from
and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour;
and shall, at stated times, receive for their serivcts, a compensation,
which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.

Section II.

1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity,
arising under this constitution, the laws of the United States, and
treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority; to all
cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls; to
all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction; to controversies to
which the United States shall be a party, to controversies between
two or more states, between a state and citizens of another state,
state, claiming lands under grants of different states, and between a
state, or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or subjects.

2 In all cases, affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and
consuls; and those in which a state shall be a party, the supreme
court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before
mentioned, the supreme court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both
as to law and fact; with such exceptions, and under such regulations,
as the Congress shall make.

3. The trial of all crimes except in cases of impeachment, shall
be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the state where the said
crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within
any state, the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress
may by law have directed.

Section III.

1. Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying
war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid
and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the
testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in
open court.

2. The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of
treason; but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood,
or forfeiture, except during the life of the person attainted.

Article IV—section I.

Full faith and credit shall be given, in each state, to the public
acts, records and judicial proceedings of every other state. And the
Congress may, by penal laws, prescribe the manner in which such
acts, records, and proceedings shall be proved and the effect thereof.

Section II.

1. The citizens of each state shall be entitled to all the privileges
and immunities of citizens in the several states.

**

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2. A person charged in any tale with treason, felony or other
crime, who shall flee from justice and found in another state, shall
on demand of the executive authority of the state from which be fled,
be delivered up, to be removed to the state, having jurisdiction of the
crime.

3. No person, held to service or labor in one state, under the
laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law
or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor; but
shall he delivered up on claim of the party to whom such service or
labor may be due.

Section III.

1. New states may be admitted by the congress into this union;
but no new state shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of
any other state—nor any state be formed by the junction of two or
more states or parts of states—without the consent of the legislatures
of the states concerned as well as of the Congress.

2. The Congress shall have power to dispose of, and make all
needful cutes and regulations respecting the territory or other pro-
perty belonging to the United States; and nothing in this constitu-
tion shall be so construed, as to prejudice any claims of the United
States, or of any particular state.

Section IV.

The United States shall guarantee to every state in this union, a re-
publican form of government; and shall protect each of them against
invasion, and on application of the legislature, or of the executive
(when the legislature cannot be convened) against domestic violence.

Article V.

The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both Houses shall deem it
necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or on the
application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the several states, shall
call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either case,
shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of this constitution,
when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several states,
or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one or the other
mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress. Provided,
that no amendment, which may he made prior to the year one thous-
and eight hundred and eight, shall in any manner affect the first and
fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first article; and that no
state, without its consent shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the
Senate.

Article VI.

1. All debts contracted, and engagements entered into before the
adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid against the U.United States,
under this Constitution as under the confederation.

2 This Constitution and the laws of the United States which shall
be made in pursuance thereof, and all treatise made, or which shall be
made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme
law of the land, and the judges, in every state, shall be bound there-
by, any thing in the Constitution or laws of any state to the contrary
notwithstanding.

United States'
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3. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the
members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and judi-
cial officers, both of the United States and of the several states, shall
be bound, by oath or affirmation to support his constitution; but no
religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or
public trust under the United States.

Article VII.

The ratification of the conventions of nine states shall be sufficient
for the establishment of this Constitution between the states so ra-
tifying the same.

Done in Convention, by the unanimous consent of
the states present, the seventeenth day of Septem-
ber, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven
hundred and eighty seven, and of the Indepen-
dence of the United States of America, the 12th.
In witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed
our names.

GeorgeWashington, .

President, and Deputy from Virginia .

New Hampshire.
JohnLangdon, ,
NicholasGilman,
Massachusetts.
NathanielGorham, ,
RufusKing, .
Connecticut.
William S.Johnson, ,
RogerSherman, .
New York.
AlexanderHamilton, .
New Jersey.
WilliamLivingston, ,
DavidBrearley, ,
WilliamPatterson, ,
JonathanDayton, .
Pennsylvania.
BenjaminFranklin, ,
ThomasMifflin, ,
RobertMorris, ,
GeorgeClymer, ,
ThomasFitzsimons, ,
JaredIngersoll, ,
JamesWilson, ,
GouverneurMorris, .
Delaware.
GeorgeReed, ,
GunningBedford, Jun.
JohnDickinson, ,
RichardBasset, ,
JacobBroom, .
Maryland.
James M.Henry, ,
Daniel of St. Thomas,
Jenifer,
DanielCarrol, .
Virginia.
JohnBlair, ,
JamesMadison, Jun.
North Carolina.
WilliamBlount, ,
Richard D.Sapight, ,
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HughWilliamson, .
South Carolina.
JohnRutledge, ,
Charles C.Pinckney, ,
CharlesPinckney, ,
PierceButler, ,
Georgia.
WilliamFew, ,
AbrahamBaldwin, .

attest,
WilliamJackson, , Sec'rysecretary .

Addition to Amendments
Amendments.

The following Articles in addition to, and amendment of
the Constitution of the United States, having been ra-
tified by the Legislatures of nine states, are equally ob-
ligatory with the Constitution itself.

1.—Congress shall make no law respecting an es-
tablishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exer-
cise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or
of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to
assemble, and to petition the government for a re-
dress of grievances.

2.—A well regulated militia being necessary to the
security of a free state, the right of the people to keep
and bear arms shall not be infringed.

3.—No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered
in any house, without the consent of the owner; nor
in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by
law.

4.—The right of the people to be secure in their
persons, houses, papers, and affects, against unrea-
sonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated;
and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause,
supported by oath or affirmation—and particularly
describing the place to be searched, and the persons
or things to be seized.

5.—No person shall be held to answer for a capital
or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment

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or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising
in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in
actual service, in time of war, or public danger; nor
shall any person be subject, for the same offence, to
be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be
compelled in any criminal case, to be witness against
himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property,
without due process of law; nor shall private proper-
ty be taken for public use, without just compensation.

6.—In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall
enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an im-
partial jury, of the state and district, wherein the
crime shall have been committed; which district
shall have been previously ascertained by law; and
to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusa-
tion; to be confronted with the witnesses against
him; to have compulsory process for obtaining wit-
nesses in his favor; and to have the assistance of
counsel for his defence.

7.—In suits at common law, where the value in
controversy, shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of
trial by jury, shall be preserved; and no fact tried
by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any court
of the United States, than according to the rules of
the common law.

8.—Excessive bail shall not be required, nor exces-
sive fines imposed; nor cruel and unusual punish-
ments inflicted.

9.—The enumeration, in the constitution, of cer-
tain rights, shall not be construed to deny or dispa-
rage others, retained by the people.

10.—The powers, not delegated to the U.United States, by
the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are
reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.

11.—The judicial power of the United States shall
not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equi-
ty, commenced or prosecuted against one of the U.
States by citizens of another state, or by citizens or
subjects of any foreign state.

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12.—The electors shall meet in their respective
states, and vote by ballot for President and Vice Pre-
sident, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabi-
tant of the same state with themselves; they shall
name in their ballot the person voted for as Presi-
dent, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as
vice-President; and they shall make distinct lists of
all persons voted for as President, and of all persons
voted for as vice-president, and of the number of
votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify,
and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of
the United States, directed to the President of the
Senate; the president of the Senate shall, in the pre-
sence of the Senate and House of Representatives,
open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be
counted; the person having the greatest number of
votes for President, shall be the President, if such
number be a majority of the whole number of electors
appointed; and if no person have such majority, then
from the persons having the highest numbers, not ex-
ceeding three, on the list of those voted for as Presi-
dent, the House of Representatives shall choose imme-
diately, by ballot, the president. But in choosing
the President, the votes shall be taken by shares, the
representation from each state having one vote; a
quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or
members from two thirds of the states, and a majo-
rity of all the states shall be necessary to a choice.
And if the house of representatives shall not choose a
president whenever the right of choice shall devolve
upon them, before the fourth day of March next fol-
lowing, then the vice president shall act as president,
as in the case of the death or other constitutional dis-
ability of the president.

2.—The person having the greatest number of
votes as vice-president, shall be the vice-president, if
such number be a majority of the whole number of
electors appointed; and if no person have a majority
then from the two highest members on the list, the se-

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nate shall choose the vice-president; a quorum for
the purpose shall consist of two thirds of the whole
number shall be necessary to a choice.

3.—But no person constitutionally ineligible to the
office of president, shall be eligible to that of vice-
president of the United States.

13.—If any citizen of the United States shall ac-
cept, claim, receive, or retain any title of nobility or
honor, or shall, without the consent of congress, ac-
cept and retain any present, pension, office or emolu-
ment of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king,
prince, or foreign power, such per on shall cease to
be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapa-
ble of holding any office of trust or profit under them,
or either of them.

Constitution Directory
Constitution
of the
State of Missouri.
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We the people of Missouri, inhabiting the limits herein
after designated, by our Representatives in Convention
assembled, at St. Louis, on Monday the 12th day of June, 1820, do mutually agree to form and establish
a free and independent republic, by the name of ``The
States of Missouri.'' and for the government
thereof do ordain and establish this constitution.

Article 1.
of boundaries.

We do declare, establish, ratify and confirm the following as the
permanent boundaries of said state, that is to say: ``Beginning in
the middle of the Mississippi river on the parallel of thirty-six de-
grees of north latitude; thence west along the said parallel of lati-
tude to the St. Francois river; thence up and following the course
of that river, in the middle of the main channel thereof, to the pa-
rallel of latitude of thirty-six degrees and thirty minutes; thence
west along the same to a point where the said parallel is interesected
by a meredian line passing through the middle of the mouth of the
Kansas river, where the same empties into the Missouri river, thence
from the point aforesaid north, along the said meredian line, to the
intersection of the parallel of latitude which passes through the
rapids of the river Des moines, making the said line correspond with
the Indian boundary line; thence east, from the point of intersec-
tion last aforesaid, along the said parallel of latitude, to the middle
of the channel of the main fork of the said river Des Moines; thence
down and along the middle of the main channel of the said river

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Des Moines to the mouth of the same, where it empties into the
Mississippi river; thence due east to the middle of the main channel
of the Mississippi river; thence down and following the course of
the Mississippi river, in the middle of the main channel thereof, to
the place of beginning.

Article II.
of the distribution of powers.

The powers of government shall be divided into three distinct de-
partments, each of which shall be confided to a separate magistracy;
and no person charged with the exercise of powers properly be-
longing to one of those departments shall exercise any power pro-
perly belonging to either of the others, except in the instances here-
inafter expressly directed or permitted.

Article III.
of the legislative power.

Section 1.—The legislative power shall be vested in a ``General
Assembly,'' which shall consist of a ``Senute,'' and of a ``House of
Representatives''

Secsection 2—The House of Representatives shall consist of members to
be chosen every second year by the qualified electors of the several
counties. Each county shall have at least one representative, but
the whole number of Representatives shall never exceed one hun-
dred.

Secsection 3—No person shall be a member of the House of Represen-
tatives who shall not have attained to the age of twenty four years;
who shall not be a free while male citizen of the United States; who
shall not have been an inhabitant of this state two years, and of the
county which he represents one year next before his election, if
such county shall have been so long established, but if not, then of
the county or counties from which the same shall have been taken:
and who shall not, moreover, have paid a state or county tax.

Secsection 4—The general assembly at their first session, and in the
years one thousand eight hundred and twenty two, and one thousand
eight hundred and twenty four, respectively, and every fourth year
thereafter, shall cause an enumeration of the inhabitants of this state
to be made; and, at the first session after each enumeration, shall
apportion the number of representatives among the several counties
according to the number of free white male inhabitants therein.

Secsection 5—The Senators shall be chosen by the qualified electors for
the term of four years. No person shall be a senator who shall not
have attained to the age of thirty years; who shall not be a free
white male citizen of the United States; who shall not have been an
inhabitant of this state four years, and of the district which he may
be chosen to represent one year next before his election, if such dis-

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trict shall have been so long established, but if not, then of the dis-
trict or districts from which the same shall have been taken; and
who shall not, moreover, have paid a state or county tax

Secsection 6—The Senate shall consist of not less than fourteen, nor
more than thirty three members; for the election of whom she state
shall be divided into convenient districts, which may be altered from
time to time, and new districts established, as public convenience
may require; and the senators shall be apportioned among the se-
veral districts according to the number of free white male inhabit-
ants in each; Provided, that when a senatorial district shall be com-
posed of two or more counties, the counties of which such district
consists shall not be entirely separated by any county belonging to
another district, and no county shall be divided in forming a district.

Secsection 7—At the first session of the general assembly, the senators
shall be divided by lot, as equally as may be, into two classes. The
seats of the first class shall be vacated at the end of the second year
and the seats of the second class at the end of the fourth year; so
that one half of the senators shall be chosen every second year.

Secsection 8—After the first day of January, one thousand eight hundred
and twenty-two, all general elections shall commence on the first
Monday in August, and shall be held biennially; and the electors, in
all cases, except of treason, felony or breach of the peace, shall be
privileged from arrest during their continuance at elections, and in
going to, and returning from the same.

Secsection 9—The Governor shall issue writs of election to fill such va-
cancies as may occur in either house of the general assembly.

Secsection 10—Every free white male citizen of the United States who
shall have attained to the age of twenty one years, and who shall
have resided in this state one year before an election, the last three
months whereof shall have been in the county or district in which
he offers to vote, shall be deemed a qualified elector of all elective
offices; provided, that no soldier, seaman or marine, in the regular
army or navy of the United States shall be entitled to vote at any
election in this

Secsection 11— of any court of law or equity, secretary of
state, a state auditor, state or county treasurer, re-
gister clerk of any court of record, sheriff, coroner, mem-
ber of congress nor other person holding any lucrative office, under
the United States or this state, militia officers. justices of the peace
masters excepted, shall be eligible to either house of the general
assembly.

Secsection 12—No person who now is, or who hereafter may be, a col-
lector or holder of public money, nor any assistant or deputy of such
collector or holder of public money, shall be eligible to either house
of the general assembly, nor to any office of profit trust until he
shall have accounted for and paid all sums for which he may be ac-
countable.

Secsection 13—No person while he continues to exercise the functions
of a bishop, priest, clergyman, or teacher of any religions persuasion,
denomination, society or sect whatsoever, shall be eligible to either
house of the general assembly; nor shall he be appointed to any of-

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fice of profit within the state, the office of justice of the peace ex-
cepted.

Secsection 14—The general assembly shall have power to exclude from
every office of honor, trust or profit within this state, and from the
right of suffrage, all persons convicted of bribery, perjury, or other
infamous crimes.

Secsection 15—Every person who shall be convicted of having, directly
or indirectly, given or offered any bribe to procure his election or
appointment shall be disqualified for any office of honor, trust or
profit under this state; and any person who shall give or offer any
bribe to procure the election or appointment of any other person,
shall, on conviction thereof be disqualified for an elector, or for any
office of honor, trust or profit under this state for ten years after such
conviction.

Secsection 16—No senator or representative shall, during the term for
which he shall have been elected, be appointed to any civil office
under this state which shall have been created, or the emoluments
of which shall have been increased during his continuance in office,
except to such offices as shall be filled by elections of the people.

Secsection 17—Each house shall appoint its own officers, and shall
judge of the qualifications, elections and returns of its own members.
A majority of each house shall constitute a quorum to do business;
but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, and may compel
the attendance of absent members in such manner, and under such
penalties, as each house may provide.

Secsection 18—Each house may determine the rules of of its proceed-
ings; punish its members for disorderly behaviour and with the con-
currence of two thirds of all the members elected, expel a member,
but no member shall be expelled a second time, for the same cause.
They shall each, from time to time, publish a journal of their pro-
ceedings, except such parts as may in their opinion require secrecy,
and the yeas and nays on any question shall be entered on the jour-
nal at the desire of any two members.

Secsection 19—The doors of each house, and of committees of the
whole, shall be kept open, except in cases which may require se-
crecy; and each house may punish by fine or imprisonment any
person not a member who shall be guilty of disrespect to the house
by any disorderly or contemptuous behaviour in their presence, dur-
ing their session; provided, that such fine shall not exceed three
hundred dollars, and such imprisonment shall not exceed forty-eight
hours for one offence.

Secsection 20—Neither house shall, without the consent of the other,
adjourn for more than two days at any one time, nor to any other
place than to that in which the two houses may be sitting.

Secsection 21—Bills may originate in either house, and may be altered,
amended, or rejected by the other; and every bill shall be read on
three different days in each house, unless two thirds of the house
where the same is depending shall dispense with this rule; and
every bill, having passed both houses, shall be sighed by the speaker
of the house of representatives and by the president of the senate.

Secsection 22—When any officer, civil or military, shall be appointed by

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the joint or concurrent vote of both houses, or by the separate vote
of either house of the general assembly, the votes shall be publicly
given viva voce, and entered on the journals. The whole list of
members shall be called, and the names of absentees shall be noted
and published with the journal.

Secsection 23—Senators and representatives shall, in all cases, except of
treason, felony or breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest
during the session of the general assembly, and for fifteen days next
before the commencement, and after the termination of each session;
and for any speech or debate in either house they shall not be ques-
tioned in any other place.

Secsection 24—The members of the general assembly shall severally re-
ceive from the public treasury a compensation for their services,
which may from time to time be increased or diminished by law;
but no alteration increasing, or tending to increase the compensation
of members, shall take effect during the session at which such altera-
tion shall be made

Secsection 25—The general assembly shall direct by law in what man-
ner and in what courts, suits may be brought against the state

Secsection 26—The general assembly shall have no power to pass laws.

First—For the emancipation of slaves without the consent of
their owners; or without paying them before such emancipation,
a full equivalent for such slaves so emancipated; and

Second—To prevent bona fide emigrants to this state, or actual
settlers therein, from bringing from any of the United States, or
from any of their territories, such persons as may there be deem-
ed to be slaves, so long as any persons of the same description
allowed to be held as slaves by the laws of this state.

They shall have power to pass laws.

First.—To prohibit the introduction into this state of any slaves
who may have committed any high crime in any other state or
territory;

Second—To prohibit the introduction of any slave for the pur-
pose of speculation or as an article of trade or merchandize;

Third—To prohibit the introduction of any slave, or the offspring
of any slave, who heretofore may have been, or who hereafter
may be imported from any foreign country into the U.United States,
or any territory thereof in contravention of any existing statute
of the United States; and

Fourth—To permit the owners of slaves to emancipate them,
saving the rights of creditors, where the person so emancipating
will give security that the slave so emancipated shall not be-
come a public charge

It shall be their duty, as soon as may be, to pass such laws as may
be necessary

First—To prevent free negroes and mulattoes from coming to,
and settling in this state, under any pretext whatsoever; and

Second—To oblige the owners of slaves to treat them with hu-
manity, and to abstain from all injuries to them extending to life
or limb.

*

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Secsection 27—In prosecutions for crimes, slaves shall not be deprived
of an impartial trial by jury, and a slave convicted of a capital of-
fence shall suffer the same degree of punishment, and no other, that
would be inflicted on a free white person for a like offence; and
courts of justice before whom slaves shall be tried shall assign them
counsel for their defence.

Secsection 28—Any person who shall maliciously deprive of life or dis-
member a slave, shall suffer such punishment as would be inflicted
for the like offence if it were committed on a free white person.

Secsection 29—The governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state,
auditor, treasurer, attorney general, and all judges of the courts of
law and equity shall be liable to impeachment for any misdemeanor
in office; but judgment in such case shall not extend farther than re-
moval from office, and disqualification to hold any office of honor,
trust or profit under the state. The party impeached, whether con-
victed or acquitted shall nevertheless be liable to be indicted, tried
and punished according to law.

Secsection 30—The house of representatives shall have the sole power
of impeachment. All impeachments shall be tried by the senate,
and when sitting for that purpose, the senators shall be on oath or
affirmation to do justice according to law and evidence When the
governor shall be tried, the presiding judge of the supreme court
shall preside; and no person shall be convicted without the concur-
rence of two thirds of all the senators present

Secsection 31—A state treasurer shall be biennially appointed by joint
vote of the two houses of the general assembly, who shall keep his of-
fice at the seat of government No money shall be drawn from the
treasury but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and an
accurate account of the receipts and expenditures of the public
money shall be annually published.

Secsection 32—The appointment of all officers not otherwise directed
by this constitution shall be made in such manner as may be pres-
cribed by law; and all officers both civil and military under the au-
thority of this state shall, before entering on the duties of their respec-
tive offices, take an oath or affirmation to support the constitution o-
the United States, and of this state, and to demean themselves faith-
fully in office.

Secsection 33—The general assembly shall meet on the third Monday in
September next; on the first Monday in November eighteen hun-
dred and twenty one; on the first Monday in November eighteen
hundred and twenty-two; and thereafter the general assembly shall
meet once in every two years, and such meeting shall be on the first
Monday in November, unless a different day shall be appointed by
law.

Secsection 34—No county now established by law shall ever be reduc-
ed by the establishment of new counties to less than twenty miles
square; nor shall any county hereafter be established which shall
contain less than four hundred square miles.

Secsection 35—Within five years after the adoption of this constitution,
all the statute laws of a general nature, both civil and criminal, shall
be revised, digested, and promulgated in such manner as the gene-

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ral assembly shall direct; and a like revision, digest and promulga-
tion shall be made at the expiration of every subsequent period of
ten years.

Secsection 36—The style of the laws of this state shall be, ``Be it enact-
ed by the general assembly of the State of Missouri.''

Article IV.
of the executive power.

Section 1—The supreme executive power shall be vested in a chief
magistrate, who shall be styled ``The Governor of the State of Mis-
souri.''

Secsection 2—The governor shall be at least thirty-five years of age, and
a natural born citizen of the United States, or a citizen at the adop-
tion of the constitution of the United States, or an inhabitant of that
part of Louisiana now included in the state of Missouri at the time
of the cession thereof from France to the United States, and shall
have been a resident of the same at least four years next before his
election.

Secsection 3—The governor shall hold his office for four years, and un-
til a successor be duly appointed and qualified. He shall be elected
in the manner following: At the time and place of voting for mem-
bers of the house of representatives, the qualified electors shall vote
for a governor; and when two or more persons have an equal num-
ber of votes, and a higher number than any other person, the elec-
tion shall be decided between them by a joint vote of both houses of
the general assembly at their next session.

Secsection 4—The governor shall be intelligible for the next four years,
after the expiration of his term of service.

Secsection 5—The governor shall be commander in chief of the militia
and navy of this state, except when they shall be called into the
service of the United States; but he need not command in person
unless advised so to do by a resolution of the general assembly.

Secsection 6—The governor shall have power to remit fines and forfei-
tures, and, except in cases of impeachment, to grant reprieves and
pardons.

Secsection 7—The governor shall, from time to time, give to the gene-
ral assembly information relative to the state of the government and
shall recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall
deem necessary and expedient. On extraordinary occasions he may
convene the general assembly by proclamation, and shall state to
them the purposes for which they are convened.

Secsection 8—The governor shall take care that the laws be distributed
and faithfully executed; and he shall be a conservator of the peace,
throughout the state.

Secsection 9—When any office shall become vacant, the governor shall
appoint a person to fill such vacancy, who shall continue in office
until a successor be duly appointed and qualified according to law.

Secsection 10—Every bill which shall have been passed by both houses
of the general assembly shall, before it becomes a law, be presented

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to the governor for his approbation. If he approve, he shall sign it;
if not, he shall return it with his objections to the house in which it
shall have originated, and the house shall cause the objections to be
entered at large on its journals, and shall proceed to re-consider the
bill. If, after such re-consideration, a majority of all the members
elected to that house shall agree to pass the same, it shall be sent, to-
gether with the objections, to the other house, by which it shall be
in like manner re-considered, and if approved by a majority of all
the members elected to that house, it shall become a law. In all
such cases the votes of both houses shall be taken by yeas and nays,
and the names of the members voting for and against the bill shall be
entered on the journal of each house respectively. If any bill shall
not be returned by the governor within ten days (Sundays excepted)
after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall become a
law in like manner as if the governor had signed it, unless the general
assembly by its adjournment shall prevent its return, in which case
it shall not become a law.

Secsection 11—Every resolution to which the concurrence of the senate
and house of representatives, may be necessary, except on cases of
adjournment, shall be presented to the governor, and before the
same shall take effect shall be proceeded upon in the same manner
as in the case of a bill.

Secsection 12—There shall be an auditor of public accounts, whom the
governor, by and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall
appoint. He shall continue in office four years, and shall perform
such duties as may be prescribed by law. His office shall be kept
at the seat of government.

Secsection 13—The governor shall, at stated times, receive for his ser-
vices an adequate salary to be fixed by law, which shall neither be
increased nor diminished during his continuance in office, and which
shall never be less than two thousand dollars annually.

Secsection 14—There shall be a lieutenant governor, who shall be elect-
ed at the same time, in the same manner, for the same term, and
shall possess the same qualifications as the governor. The electors
shall distinguish for whom they vote as governor, and for whom as
lieutenant governor.

Secsection 15—The lieutenant governor shall by virtue of his office be
president of the senate. In committee of the whole he may debate
on all questions; and when there is an equal division, be shall give
the casting vote in senate, and also in joint votes of both houses.

Secsection 16—When the office of governor, shall become vacant by
death, resignation, absence from the state, removal from office, re-
fusal to qualify impeachment or otherwise, the lieutenant governor;
or in case of like disability on his part, the president of the senate
pro tempore; or if there be no president of the senate pro-tempore,
the speaker of the house of representatives, shall possess all the
powers, and discharge all the duties of governor and shall receive
for his services the like compensation, until such vacancy be filled,
or the governor so absent or impeached shall return or be acquitted.

Secsection 17—Whenever the office of governor shall become vacant
by death, resignation, removal from office; or otherwise, the lieuten-

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ant governor, or other person exercising the powers of governor for
the time being, shall as soon as may be, cause, an election to the held
to fill such vacancy, giving three months previous notice thereof;
and the person elected shall not thereby be rendered ineligible to the
office of governor for the next succeeding term. Nevertheless, if
such vacancy shall happen within eighteen months of the end of the
term for which the late governor shall have been elected, the same
shall not be filled

Secsection 18—The lieutenant governor, or president of the senate pro-
tempore, while presiding in the senate, shall receive the same com-
pensation as shall be allowed to the speaker of the houseof repre-
sentatives.

Secsection 19—The returns of all elections of governor and lieutenant
governor shall be made to the secretary of state, in such manner as
may be prescribed by law.

Secsection 20—Contested elections of governor and lieutenant governor
shall be decided by joint vote of both houses of the general assem-
bly, in such manner as may be prescribed by law.

Secsection 21—There shall be a secretary of state, whom the governor,
by and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint He
shall hold his office four years, unless sooner removed on impeach-
ment. He shall keep a register of all the official acts and proceed-
ings of the governor, and when necessary shall attest them; and he
shall lay the same, together with all papers relative thereto, before
either house of the general assembly whenever required so to do,
and shall perform such other duties as may be enjoined on him by
law.

Secsection 22—The secretary of state shall, as soon as may be, procure
a seal of state, with such emblems and devices as shall be directed
by law, which shall not be subject to change. It shall be called the
``Great Seal of the State of Missouri.'' shall be kept by the secre-
tary of state, and all official acts of the governor, his approbation of
the laws excepted, shall be thereby authenticated.

Secsection 23—There shall be appointed in each county a sheriff, and a
coroner, who, until the general assembly shall otherwise provide,
shall be elected by the qualified electors at the time and place of
electing representatives. They shall serve for two years, and until
a successor be duly appointed and qualified, unless sooner removed
for misdeameanor in office, and shall be ineligible four years in any
period of eight years. The sheriff and coroner shall each give secu-
rity for the faithful discharge of the duties of his office in such man-
ner as shall be prescribed by law Whenever a county shall be here-
after established, the governor shall appoint a sheriff and coroner
therein, who shall each continue in office until the nest general elec-
tion and until a successor shall be duly qualified.

Secsection 24—When vacancies happen in the office of sheriff or coron-
er, they shall be filled by appointment of the governor; and the
persons so appointed shall continue in office until successors shall
be duly qualified, and shall not be thereby rendered ineligible for the
next succeeding term.

Secsection 25—In all elections of sheriff and coroner, when two or more

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persons have an equal number of votes, and a higher number than
any other person, the circuit courts of the counties respectively shall
give the casting vote; and all contested elections for the said offices
shall be decided by the circuit courts respectively, in such manner as
the general assembly may by law prescribe.

Article V.
of the judicial power.

Section 1—The Judicial power as to matters of law and equity,
shall be vested in a ``Supreme Court'' in a ``Chancellor;'' in ``Cir-
cuit Courts,'' and in such inferior tribunals as the general assembly
may, from time to time, ordain and establish.

Secsection 2—The supreme court, except in cases otherwise directed by
this constitution, shall have appellate jurisdiction only, which shall
be co-extensive with the state, under the restrictions and limitations
in this constitution provided.

Secsection 3—The supreme court shall have a general superintending
control over all inferior courts of law. It shall have power to issue
writs of Habeas Corpus, Mandamus, Quo Warranto, Certiorari, and
other original remedial writs; and to hear and determine the same.

Secsection 4—The supreme court shall consist of three Judges, any two
of whom shall be a quorum; and the said judges shall be conserva-
tors of the peace throughout the state.

Secsection 5—The state shall be divided into convenient districts, not
to exceed four, in each of which the supreme court shall hold two
sessions annually, at such place as the general assembly shall ap-
point; and when sitting in either district, it shall exercise jurisdic-
tion over causes originating in that district only; provided, how-
ever, that the general assembly may at any time hereafter direct by
law, that the said court shall be held at one place only.

Secsection 6—The circuit court shall have jurisdiction over all criminal
cases which shall not be otherwise provided for by law; and exclu-
sive original jurisdiction in all civil cases which shall not be cogniza-
ble before justices of the peace, until otherwise directed by the ge-
neral assembly. It shall hold its terms in such place in each county
as may be by law directed

Secsection 7—The state shall be divided into convenient circuits, for
each of which a judge shall be appointed, who, after his appoint-
ment, shall reside, and be a conservator of the peace within the cir-
cuit for which he shall be appointed.

Secsection 8—The circuit courts shall exercise a superintending control
over all such inferior tribunals as the General Assembly may estab-
lish, and over justices of the peace in each county in their respec-
tive circuits.

Secsection 9—The jurisdiction of the court of chancery shall be co-ex-
tensive with the state, and the times and places of holding its ses-
sions shall be regulated in the same manner as those of the supreme
court.

and all indictments shall conclude, ``against the peace and dignity of
the state.''

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Sec 10—The court of chancery shall have original and appellate
jurisdiction in all matters of equity, and a general control over exe-
cutors, administrators, guardians and minors, subject to appeal, in
all cases, to the supreme court, under such limitations as the gene-
ral assembly may by law provide.

Secsection 11—Until the general assembly shall deem it expedient to es-
tablish, inferior courts of chancery, the circuit courts shall have ju-
risdiction in matters of equity, subject to appeal to the court of chan-
cery, in such manner, and under such restrictions, as shall be pre-
scribed by law

Secsection 12—Inferior tribunals shall be established in each county for
the transaction of all county business; for appointing guardians; for
granting letters testamentary, and of administration; and for set-
tling the accounts of executors, administrators and guardians.

Secsection 13—The governor shall nominate, and, by and with the ad-
vice and consent of the senate, appoint the judges of the supreme
court, the judges of the circuit courts, and the chancellor, each of
whom shall bold his office during good behaviour, and shall receive
for his services a compensation which shall not be diminished dur-
ing his continuance in office, and which shall not be less than two
thousand dollars annually.

Sec 14—No person shall be appointed a judge of the supreme
court, nor of a circuit, nor chancellor, before he shall have attained
to the age of thirty years; nor shall any person continue to exercise
the duties of said offices after he shall have attained to the age of
sixty-five years.

Secsection 15—The courts respectively shall appoint their clerks, who
shall hold their offices during good behaviour. For any misdemeanor
in office they shall be liable to be tried and removed by the su-
preme court, in such manner as the general assembly shall by law
provide.

Sec 16—Any judge of the supreme court or of the circuit court,
or the chancellor, may be removed from office on the address of two
thirds of each house of the general assembly to the governor for that
purpose; but each house shall state on its respective journal the
cause for which it shall wish the removal of such judge or chancel-
lor, and give him notice thereof, and he shall have the right to be
heard in his defence in such manner as the general assembly shall
by law direct; but no judge nor chancellor shall be removed in this
manner for any cause for which he might have been impeached.

Secsection 17—In each county there shall be appointed as many justices
of the peace as the public good may be thought to require. Their
powers and duties, and their duration in office shall be regulated by
law

Secsection 18—An attorney-general shall be appointed by the governor,
by and with the advice and consent of the senate. He shall remain
in office four years, and shall perform such duties as shall be requir-
ed of him by law.

Sec 19—All writs and process shall run, and all prosecutions shall
be conducted, in the name of the ``State of Missouri,'' all write shall
be tested by the clerk of the court from which they shall be issued,

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Article VI.
of education.

Section 1—Schools and the means of education shall forever be
encouraged in this state; and the general assembly shall take mea-
sures to preserve from waste or damage such lands as have been, or
hereafter may be granted by the United States for the use of schools
within each township in this state, and shall apply the funds which
may arise from such lands in strict conformity to the object of the
grant; and one school, or more, shall be established in each town-
ship as soon as practicable and necessary, where the poor shall be
taught gratis.

Secsection 2—The general assembly shall take measures for the im-
provement of such lands as have been, or hereafter may be granted
by the United States to this state for the support of a seminary of
learning; and the funds accruing from such lands, by rent or lease,
or in any other manner, or which may be obtained from any other
source for the purposes aforesaid, shall be and remain a permanent
fund to support a university for the promotion of literature, and of
the arts and sciences; and it shall be the duty of the general assem-
bly, as soon as may be, to provide effectual means for the improve-
ment of such lands, and for the improvement, and permanent secu-
rity of the funds and endowments of such institution.

Article VII.
of internal improvement.

Internal improvement shall forever be encouraged by the govern-
ment of this state; and it shall be the duty of the general assembly,
as soon as may be, to make provision by law for ascertaining the
most proper objects of improvement in relation both to roads and
navigable waters; and it shall also be their duty to provide by law
for a systematick and economical application of the funds appro-
priated to these objects.

Article VIII.
of banks.

The general assembly may incorporate one banking company, and
no more to be in operation at the same time.

The bank to be incorporated may have any number of branches,
not to exceed five to be established by law; and not more than one
branch shall be established at any one session of the general assem-
bly. The capital stock of the bank to be incorporated shall never
exceed five millions of dollars, at least one half of which shall be re-
served for the use of the state.

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Article IX.
of the militia.

Section 1—Field officers and company officers shall be elected by
the persons subject to militia duty within their respective commands.
Brigadiers general shall be elected by the field officers of their res-
pective brigades; and majors general by the brigadiers and field of-
ficers of their respective divisions, until otherwise directed by law.

Secsection 2—General and field officers shall appoint their officers of the
staff.

Secsection 3—The Governor shall appoint an adjutant general, and all other militia officers whose appointments are not otherwise provided
for in this constitution.

ARTICLE X.
of miscellaneous provisions.

Section 1—The general assembly of this state shall never interfere
with the primary disposal of the soil of the United States, nor with
any regulation congress may find necessary for securing the title in
such soil to the bona-fide purchasers. No tax shall be imposed on
lands the property of the United States, nor shall lands belonging
to persons residing out of the limits of this state ever be taxed higher
than the lands belonging to persons residing within the state.

Secsection 2—The state shall have concurrent jurisdiction on the river
Mississippi, and on every other river bordering on the said state, so
far as the said river shall form a common boundary to the said state
and any other state or states now, or hereafter to he formed, and
bounded by the same; and the said river Mississippi, and the navi-
gable rivers and waters leading into the same, whether bordering on
or within this state, shall be common highways, and forever free to
the citizens of this state and of the United States, without any tax,
duty, impost or toll therefore imposed by the state.

Article XI.
of the permanent state of government.

Section 1—The general assembly at their first session shall ap-
point five commissioners for the purpose of selecting a place for the
permanent seat of government, whose duty it shall be to select four
sections of the land of the United States which shall not have been
exposed to public sale.

Secsection 2—If the commissioners believe the four sections of land so
by them to be selected be not a suitable and proper situation for the
permanent seat of government, they shall select such other place as
they deem most proper for that purpose, and report the same to the

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general assembly at the time of making their report provided for in
the first section of this article: provided that no place shall be se-
lected which is not situated on the bank of the Missouri river, and
within forty miles of the mouth of the river Osage.

Secsection 3—If the general assembly determine that the four section of
land which may be selected by authority of the first section of this
article be a suitable and proper place for the permanent seat of go-
vernment; the said commissioners shall lay out a town thereon, un-
der the direction of the general assembly; but if the general assem-
bly deem it most expedient to fix the permanent seat of government
at the place to be selected by authority of the seconds section of
this article, they shall so determine, and in that event shall autho-
rize the said commissioners to purchase any quantity of land, not ex-
ceeding six hundred and forty acres, which may be necessary for the
purpose aforesaid; and the place so selected shall be the permanent
seat of government of this state from and after the first day of Octo-
ber, one thousand eight hundred and twenty six.

Secsection 4—The general assembly, in selecting the above mentioned
commissioners, shall choose one from each extreme part of the state,
and one from the centre, and it shall require the concurrence of at
least three of the commissioners to decide upon any part of the
duties assigned them.

Article XII.
mode of amending the constitution.

The general assembly may at any time propose such amendments
to this constitution as two thirds of each house shall deem expedient,
which shall be published in all the newspapers published in this
state three several times, at least twelve months before the next ge-
neral election; and if at the first session of the general assembly
after such general election, two thirds of each house shall, by yeas
and nays, ratify such proposed amendments, they shall be valid to
all intents and purposes as parts of this constitution; provided that
such proposed amendments shall be read on three several days, in
each house, as well when the same are proposed, as when they are
finally ratified.

Article XIII.
declaration of rights.

That the general, great and essential principles of Liberty and
free government may be recognized and established, we declare,

1. That all political power is vested in, and derived from the peo-
ple.

2. That the people of this state have the inherent sole and ex-
clusive right of regulating the internal government, and police there-
of, and of altering and abolishing their constitution and form of go-

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vernment whenever it may be necessary to their safety and happi-
ness.

3. That the people have the right peaceably to assemble for their
common good, and to apply to those vested with the powers of go-
vernment for redress of grievances, by petition or remonstrance: and
that their right to bear arms in defence of themselves and of the state
cannot be questioned.

4. That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship
Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences;
that no man can be compelled to erect, support or attend any place
of worship, or to maintain any minister of the gospel or teacher of re-
ligion; that no human authority can controul or interfere with the
rights of conscience: that no person can ever be hurt, molested or
restrained in his religions profession or sentiments, if he do not
disturb others in their religious worship.

5. That no person on account of his religious opinions, can be
rendered ineligible to any office of trust or profit under this state;
that no preference can ever be given by law to any sect or mode of
worship; and that no religious corporation can ever be established
in this state.

6. That all elections shall be free and equal.

7. That courts of justice ought to be open o every person, and
certain remedy afforded for every injury to person, properly or cha-
racter; and that right and justice ought to be administered without
sale, denial or delay; and that no private properly ought to be taken
or applied to public use without just compensation.

8. That the right of trial by jury shall renisin inviolate.

9. That in all criminal prosecutions, the accused has the right to
be heard by himself and his counsel; to demand the nature and
cause of accusation; to have compulsory process for witnesses in his
favor: to meet the witnesses against him face to face; and, in pro-
secutions on presentment or indictment, to a speedy tria by an im-
partial jury of the vicinage; that the accused cannot be compelled to
give evidence against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or pro-
perty but by the judgment of his peers or the law of land.

10. That no person, after having been once acquitted by a jury,
can, for the same offence, be again put in jeopardy of life or limb,
but if in any criminal prosecution the jury be divided in opinion at
the end of the term, the court before which the trial shall be had, may
in its discretion, discharge the jury, and commit or bail the accused
for trial at the next term of such court.

11. That all persons shall be bailable by sufficient sureties, ex-
cept for capital offences when the proof is evident or the presumption
great; and the privilege of the writ of Habeas Corpus cannot be
suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public
safety may require it.

12. That excessive bail shall not be required nor excessive fines
imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted

13. That the people ought to be secure in their persons, papers,
houses and effects from unreasonable searches and seizures; and no
warrant to search any place or to seize any person or thing can is-

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sue, without describing the place to be searched, or the person or
thing to be seized, as nearly as may be, nor without probable cause
supported by oath or affirmation.

14. That no person can for an indictable offence, be proceeded
against criminally by information, except in cases arising in the land
or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual service in time of
war or public danger, or by leave of the court for oppression or mis-
demeanor in office.

15. That treason against the state can consist only in levying war
against it, or in adhering to its enemies, giving them aid and comfort;
that no person can be convicted of treason unless on the testimony
of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on his own confession in
open court; that no person can be attainted of treason or felony by
the general assembly; that no conviction can work corruption of
blood or forfeiture of estate; that the estates of such persons as may
destroy their own lives shall descend or vest as in cases of natural
death; and when any person shall be killed by casually there ought
to be no forfeiture by reason thereof.

16. That the free communication of thoughts and opinions is one
of the invaluable rights of man, and that every person may freely
speak, write and print on any subject, being responsible for the abuse
of that liberty; that in all prosecutions for libels, the truth thereof may
be given in evidence, and the jury may determine the law and the
facts, under the direction of the court.

17. That no ex-post facto law, nor law impairing the obligation of
contracts, or retrospective in its operation, can be passed, nor can
the person of a debtor be imprisoned for debt after he shall have sur-
rendered his property for the benefit of his creditors, in such manner
as may be prescribed by law.

18 That no person who is religiously scrupulous of bearing arms,
can be compelled to do so, but may be compelled to pay an equiva-
lent for military service, in such manner as shall be prescribed by
law; and that no priest, preacher of the gospel, or teacher of any re-
ligions persuasion or sect, regularly ordained as such, be subject to
militia duty, or compelled to bear arms.

19. That all property subject to taxation in this state shall be
taxed in proportion to its value.

20. That no title of nobility, hereditary emolument, privilege or
distinction shall be granted, nor any office created the duration of
which shall be longer than the good behaviour of the officer appoint-
ed to fill the same.

21. That migration from this state cannot be prohibited.

22. That the military is, and in all cases and at all times shall be
in strict subordination to the civil power; that no soldier can, in
time of peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the
owner, nor in time of war, but in such manner as may be prescribed
by law; nor can any appropriation for the support of an army be
made for a longer period than two years.

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Schedule.

Secsection 1.—That no inconvenience may arise from the change of go-
vernment, we declare that all writs, actions, prosecutions, judgments,
claims and contracts of individuals and of bodies corporate shall con-
tinue as if no change had taken place; and all process which may
before the third Monday in September next, be issued under the au-
thority of the Territory of Missouri, shall be as valid as if issued in the
name of the state.

Secsection 2—All laws now in force in the Territory of Misouri which
are not repugnant to this constitution, shall remain in force until they
expire by their own limitations, or be altered or repealed by the ge-
neral assembly.

Secsection 3—All fines, penalties, forfeitures and escheats accruing to
the Territory of Missouri, shall accrue to the use of the state.

Secsection 4.—All recognizances heretofore taken, or which may be
taken before the third Monday in September next, shall remain valid,
and shall pass over to, and may be prosecuted in the name of the
state; and all bonds executed to the governor of the territory, or to
any other officer or court in his official capacity, shall pass over to
the governor or other proper state authority, and to their successors
in office, for the uses therein respectively expressed, and may be
sued for and recovered accordingly. All criminal prosecutions and
penal actions which have arisen, or which may arise before the third
Monday in September next, and which shall then be depending,
shall be prosecuted to judgment and execution in the name of the
state. All actions at law which now are, or which, on the third
Monday in September next, may be depending in any of the courts
of record in the Territory of Missouri, may be commenced in, or
transferred to any court of record of the state which shall have juris-
diction of the subject matter thereof; and all suits in equity may,
in like manner, be commenced in, or transferred to the court of chan-
cery

Secsection 5—All officers civil and military now holding commissions
under authority of the United States, or of the Territory of Missouri,
shall continue to hold and exercise their respective offices until they
shall be superceded under the authority of the state; and all such of-
ficers holding commissions under the authority of the Territory of
Missouri shall receive the same compensation which they have
hitherto received, in proportion to the time they shall be so employ-
ed.

Secsection 6—The first meeting of the general assembly shall be at St.
Louis, with power to adjourn to any other place; and the general
assembly at the first session thereof, shall fix the seat of government
until the first day of October, eighteen hundred and twenty six; and
the first session of the general assembly shall have power to fix the
compensation of the members thereof, any thing in the constitution
to the contrary notwithstanding.

**

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Secsection 7—Until the first enumeration shall be made, as directed in
this constitution, the county of Howard shall be entitled to eight re-
presentatives; the county of Cooper to four representatives; the
county of Montgomery to two representatives; the county of Lin-
coln to one representative; the county of Pike to two representa-
tives; the county of St. Charles to three representatives; the county
of St. Louis to six representatives; the county of Franklin to two re-
presentatives; the county of Jefferson to one representative; the
county of Washington to two representatives; the county of Ste.
Genevieve to four representatives; the county of Cape Girardeau to
four representatives; the county of New Madrid to two represen-
tatives; the county of Madison to one representative; the county
of Wayne to one representative; and that part of the county of Low-
rence situated within this state, shall attach to, and form part of the
county of Wayne until otherwise provided by law, and the sheriff of
the county of Wayne shall appoint the judges of the first election, and
the place of holding the same, in the part thus attached; and any
person who shall have resided within the limits of this state five
months previous to the adoption of this constitution, and who shall
be otherwise qualified as prescribed in the third section of the third
article thereof, shall be eligible to the house of representatives, any
thing in this constitution to the contrary notwithstanding.

Sec 8—For the first election of senators the state shall be divided
into districts. and the apportionment shall be as follows, that is to
say: the counties of Howard and Cooper shall compose one district,
and elect four senators; the counties of Montgomery and Franklin
shall compose one district, and elect one senator; the county of St.
Charles shall compose one district, and elect one senator; the coun-
ties of Lincoln and Pike shall compose one district and elect one
senator; the county of St Louis shall compose one district, and elect
two senators; the counties of Washington and Jefferson shall com-
pose one district, and elect one senator; the county of Ste. Gene-
vieve shall compose one district, and elect one senator; the county
of Madison and Wayne shall compose one district, and elect one se-
nator; the counties of Cape Girardeau and New Madrid shall com-
pose one district, and elect two senators; and in all cases where a se-
natorial district consists of more than one county, it shall be the duty
of the clerk of the county second named in that district to certify the
returns of the senatorial election within their proper county to the
clerk of the county first named, within five days after he shall have
received the same; and any person who shall have resided within
the limits of this state five months previous to the adoption of this
constitution, and who shall be otherwise qualified as prescribed in
the fifth section of the third article thereof, shall be eligible to the
senate of this state, any thing in this constitution to the contrary not-
withstanding.

Secsection 9—The president of the convention shall issue writs of election to the sheriffs of the several counties (or in case of vacancy to
the coroners) requiring them to cause an election to be held on the
fourth Monday in August next for a governor; a lieutenant gover-
nor; a representative in the congress of the United States for the re-

State Constitution.
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sidue of the sixteenth Congress; a representative for the seventeenth
Congress; senators and representatives for the general assembly;
sheriffs, and coroners; and the returns of all township election
held in pursuance thereof shall be made to the clerks of the proper
county within five days after the day of election; and any person
who shall reside within the limits of this state at the time of the
edoption of this constitution, and who shall be otherwise qualified as
prescribed in the truth section of the third article thereof, shall be
deemed a qualified elector, any thing in this constitution to the con-
trary notwithstanding.

Secsection 10—The elections shall be conducted according to the ex-
isting laws of the Missouri territory. The clerks of the circuit courts
of the several counties shall certify the returns of the election of go-
vernor and lieutenant governor, and transmit the same to the speak-
er of the house of representatives at the temporary sent of govern-
ment, in such time that they may be received on the third Monday
of September next. As soon as the general assembly shall be or-
ganized, the speaker of the house of representatives and the presi-
dent pro-tempore of the senate shall, in the presence of both houses,
examine the returns, and declare who are duly elected to fill those
offices; and if any two o more persons shall have an equal number
of votes and a higher number than any other person, the general as-
sembly shall determine the election in the manner herein before
provided; and the returns of the election for member of congress
shall be made to the secretary of state within thirty days after the day
of election.

Secsection 11—The oaths of office herein directed to be taken, may be
administered by any judge or justice of the peace, until the general
assembly shall otherwise direct.

Secsection 12—Until a seal of state be provided, the governer may use
his private seal.

``Done by the representatives of the people of Mis-
souri in Convention assembled, at the town of St.
Louis, on the nineteenth day of July, in the year of
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty,
and of the independence of the United States the
forty fifth.''

DavidBarton, , President
of the Convention, and representative
from the county of St. Louis .

From the county of Cape Girardeau,

StephenByrd, ,
JosephM`Ferron, ,
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Alx'rAlexander. Buckner, ,
JamesEvans, ,
Rd. S.Thomas, .

From the county of Cooper,

Robert P.Clark, ,
WilliamLillard, ,
Robt.RobertRobertWallace, .

From the county of Franklin,

John G.Heath, .

From the county of Howard,

N. S.Burckhartt, ,
J. SmithFindlay, ,
DUffgreen, ,
Benj.BenjaminBenjamin H.Reeves, ,
JohnRay, .

From the county of Jefferson,

S.Hammond, .

From the county of Lincoln,

MalcolmHenry, .

From the county of Montgomery,

JonathanRamsay, ,
JamesTalbott, .

From the county of Madison,

NathanielCook, .

From the county of New Madrid,

Robt.Robert D.Dawson, ,
Christo.Christopher G.Houts, .

From the county of Pike,

StephenCleaner, .
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From the county of St. Charles,

Hiram H.Baber, ,
NathanBoone, ,
Benj.BenjaminEmmons, .

From the county of St. Genevieve,

R. T.Brown, ,
John D.Cook, ,
H.Dodge, ,
JohnScott, .

From the County of St. Louis,

Edw.EdwardBates, ,
Pr.Chouteau, jr.junior
A.M`Nair, ,
Bernd.BernardPratte, ,
Wm.WilliamRector, ,
Thos.Thomas F.Riddick, .
J. C.Sullivan, .

From the county of Washington,

John RiceJones, ,
JohnHutchings, ,
SamuelPerry, .

From the county of Wayne,

ElijahBettis, .

Attest.
Wm.William G.Pettus, ,
Secretary of the Convention .

Ordinance Directory
An Ordinance,

Declaring the consent of the people of the state of Missouri, by their
representatives in convention assemble, to certain conditions and
provisions in the act of congress of the sixth of March, one thousand
eight hundred and twenty, entitled `An act to authorise the people
of Missouri territory, to form a constitution and state government,
and for the admission of such state into the union on an equal foot-
ing with the original states and to prohibit stavery in certain ter
ritories'

Whereas the act of congress of the United States of America, ap-
proved March the sixth, one thousand eight hundred and twenty,

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entitled `An act to authorize the people of Missouri territory to form
a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such
state into the union on an equal footing with the original states, and
to prohibit slavery in certain territories,' contains certain requisitions
and provisions, and among other things, has offered to this conven-
tion when formed, for and in behalf of the people inhabiting this
state, for their free acceptance or rejection, the five following pro-
positions, and which, if accepted by this convention in behalf of the
people as aforesaid, are to be obligatory, on the United States, viz:

`First, That section numbered sixteen in every township, and
when such section has been sold or otherwise disposed of, other lands
equivalent thereto, and as contiguous as may be, shall be granted to
the state for the use of the inhabitants of such township for the use
of schools:

`Second, That all salt springs not exceeding twelve in number,
with six sections of land adjoining to each, shall be granted to the
said state, for the use of said state, the same to be selected by the
legislature of said state on or before the first day of January, in the
year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five, and the same,
when so selected, to be used under such terms, conditions and regu-
lations as the legislature of said state shall direct; Provided, that no
salt spring the right whereof now is, of hereafter shall be, confirmed
or adjudged to any individual or individuals, shall be this section be
granted to said state; and provided also, that the legislature shall ne-
ver sell or lease the same at any one time for a longer period than few
years without the consent of congress;

`Third, That five per cent of the nett proceeds of the sale of lands
lying within the said territory or state, and which shall be sold by
congress from, and after the first day of January next, after deducting
all expenses incident to the same, shall be reserved for making pub-
lic roads and canals, of which three fifths shall be applied to those
objects within the state under the direction of the legislature thereof,
and the other two-fifths in defraying under the direction of congress,
the expenses to be incurred in making of a road or roads, canal of
canals, leading to the said state:

`Fourth, That four entire sections of land be, and the same are
hereby granted to the said state for the purpose of fixing their seat of
government thereon; which said sections shall, under the direction
of the legislature of said state, be located as near as may be in one
body, at any time, in such townships and ranges as the legislature
aforesaid may select, on any of the public lands of the United States:
Provided, that such locations shall be made prior to the public sale of
the lands of the United Sates surrounding such location.

`Fifth, That thirty-six sections, or one entire township, which
shall be designated by the President of the United States, together
with the other lands heretofore reserved for that purpose, shall be
reserved for the use of a Seminary of learning, and vested in the le-
gislature of said state, to be appropriated sorely for the use of such
seminary by the legislature;

Now this convention, for and in behalf of the people inhabiting
this state, and by the authority of the said people, do accept the five
before recited propositions offered by the act of congress under which
they are assembled; and in pursuance of the conditions, requisitions,

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and other provisions in the before recited set of congress contained,
this convention, for and in behalf of the people inhabiting this state
do ordain, agree and declare, that every and each of laud
sold by the United States from and after the first day of January
next, shell remain exempt from say tax laid by order, under the
authority of the state, whesher for state, county or township, or any
other purpose whatever, for the term of five years from and after the
respective days of sale thereof; and that the bounty lands granted,
or hereafter to be granted, for military services during the late war,
shall, while they continue to be held by the patentees or their heirs,
remain exempt as aforesaid from taxation for the term of three years
from and after the date of the patents respectively; Provided, never-
theless, that if the congress of the United States shall consent to re-
peal and revoke the following clause in the fifth proposition of the
sixth section of the act of congress before recited, and in these words,
viz `That every and each tract of land sold by the United States
from and after the first day of January next, shall remain exempt from
any tax laid by order, or under the authority of the state, whether
for state, county or township, or any other purpose whatever, for
the term of five years from and after the day of sale,' and further—
that this convention for and in behalf of the people of the state of
Missouri, do hereby ordain, consent and agree, that the same be so
revoked and repealed, without which consent of the congress as a-
foresaid the said clause to remain in fully force and operation as first
above provided for in this ordinance; and this convention doth here-
by request the congress of the United States so to modify their third
preposition, that the whole amount of five per cent on the sale of
public lands therein offered may be applied to the construction of
roads and canals, and the promotion of education within this state,
under the direction of the legislature thereof And this convention
for and in behalf of the people inhabiting this state, and by the au-
thorisy of the said peoplef do further ordain, agree, and declare,
that this ordinance shall be irrevocable without the consent of the
United States.

Done in convention, at St Louis, in the State of missou-
ri, this nineteenth day of July, in the year of our Lord
one thousand eight hundred and twenty, and of the
Independence of the United States of America the
forty fifth.

By order of the Convention.

DavidBarton, , President .

attest.

Wm.William G.Pettus, , Secretary .

Resolution Directory
Resolution
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Providing for the admission of Mis-
souri into the Union on a certain
condition.

Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representa-
tives of the United States of America in Congress assem-
bled. That Missouri shall be admitted into this Union
on an equal footing with the original states, in all re-
spects whatever, upon the fundamental condition, that
the fourth clause of the twenty-sixth section of the
third article of the constitution submitted on the part
of said state to Congress, shall never be construed to
authorize the passage of any law, and that no law
shall be passed in conformity thereto, by which any
citizen, of either of the states in this Union shall be
excluded from the enjoyment of any of the privileges
and immunities to which such citizen is entitled under
the constitution of the United States: Provided, That
the legislature of the said state, by a solemn public
act, shall declare the assent of the said state to the
said fundamental condition, and shall transmit to the
President of the United States, on or before the fourth
Monday in November next, an authentic copy of the
said act; upon the receipt whereof, the President, by
proclamation, shall announce the fact: whereupon,
and without any further proceeding on the part of
Congress, the admission of the said state into this
Union shall be considered as complete.

Executive Directory of State Missouri
Executive, &c.
of the
State of Missouri.
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Salary.
AlexanderM`Nair, , Governor , $2,000
Wm.William H.Ashley, , Lieutenant Governor ,
JoshuaBarton, , Secretary of State , 730
EdwardBates, , Attorney General , 500
WilliamChristy, , Auditor , 730
PierreDidier, , Treasurer . 730
Judiciary.
MathiasM`Girk, , Judges of the Supreme
Court ,
2,000 each.
John D.Cook, , Judges of the Supreme
Court ,
2,000 each.
John RiceJones, , Judges of the Supreme
Court ,
2,000 each.
WilliamHarper, , Chancellor , 2,000 each.
DavidTodd, , Judge of the 1st District Court , 2,000 each.
RufusPettibone, , do 2nd do . 2,000 each.
Nathaniel BeverlyTucker, , 3d do 2,000 each.
Richard S.Thomas, , 4th do . 2,000 each.
Representatives in Congress.

DavidBarton, and Thomas H.Benton, , Senators .

JohnScott, , Representative in Congress .

Judicial Districts and Circuits,

And the Times and Places of Holding Courts.

Judicial Districts.

1st District, is composed of the counties of Cole, Cooper, Salice
Lillard, Ray, Chariton, Howard, and Boone.

**

Courts of Missouri.
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2d District, of the counties of Gasconade, Ralls Pike, Lincoln, St.
Charles, Montgomery, and Callaway.

3d District, of the counties of Franklin, Washington, Jefferson, and
St. Louis.

4th District, of the counties of Perry, St. Geneviere, Madison,
Wayne, New Madrid, and Cape Girardeau.

Supreme Court meets in the

1st District, at Franklin, Howard county, first Mondays of March
and September.

2d District, at St. Charles, St. Charles county, fourth Mondays of
March and September.

3d District, at St. Louis, St. Louis county, fourth Mondays of April
and October.

4th District, at Jackson, Cape Girardeau county, third Mondays of
June and December.

Superior Court of Chancery meets
in the

1st District, at Franklin, Howard county, first Mondays of January
and July

2d District, at St. Charles, St. Charles county, third Mondays of
January and July

3d District, at St. Louis, St. Louis county, first Mondays of February
and August.

4th District, at Jackson, Cape Girardeau county, fourth Mondays of
February and August.

Circuit Court meets in the

1st District, in Cole county, third Mondays of January, May, and
September; in Cooper county, fourth Mondays of January,
May, and September; in Saline county, 1st Mondays of Fe-
bruary. June, and October; in Lillard county, second Mon-
days of February, June, and October; in Ray county, third
Mondays of February, June, and October; in Chariton county,
fourth Mondays of February, June, and October; in Howard
county, third Mondays of March, July, and November; in
Boone county, first Mondays of April, August and December.

2d District, in Gasconade county, fourth Mondays of January, and
May, and the third Monday of September; in Callaway county,
first Mondays of February, June and October; in Montgomery
county, second Mondays of February June, and October, in
St. Charles county, third Mondays of February, June and Octo-
ber; in Lincoln county, fourth Mondays of February, June, and

Courts of Missouri.
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October; in Pike county, first Mondays of March, July. and
November; in Ralls county, second Mondays of March, July,
and November.

3d District, in Franklin county, second Mondays of March, July and
November; in Washington county, third Mondays of March,
July, and November; in Jefferson county, fourth Mondays of
March, July, and November; in St. Louis county, first Mon-
day of April, third Monday of August, and first Monday of De-
cember.

4th District, in Perry county, first Mondays of February, June, and
October; in St. Genevieve county, second Mondays of Februa-
ry, June, and October; in Madison county, first Mondays of
March, July, and November: in Wayne county, second Mon-
days of March, July, and November; in New Madrid county,
fourth Mondays of March, July, and November; in Cape Gi-
rardeau county, first Mondays of April, August, and December,

Terms of County Courts.

In Cole, Ray and Ralls counties, first Mondays of January, April,
July, and October; in Cooper, Chariton and Pike, second Mon-
days of January, April, July, and October; in Saline, Gasco-
nade, Lincoln, and St. Louis, third Mondays of January, April,
July, and October; in Lillard, Franklin, and Cape Girardeau,
fourth Mondays of January, April, July, and October; in Mont-
romery, Washington and New Madrid, first Mondays of Feb-
gnary, May, August, and November; in Callaway, Jefferson,
and Madison, second Mondays of February, May, August, and
November; in Boone, St. Genevieve and Wayne, third Mon-
days of February, May, August, and November; and in How-
ard, St. Charles and Perry, fourth Mondays of February, May.
August, and November.

Clerks of the Various Courts

Of the Supreme Court.

First Judicial District, GrayBynum, , Clerk ,

2d do. do. William G.Pettus, , clkclerk .

3d do. do. ArthurNelson, , clkclerk .

4th do. do. JamesEvans, , clkclerk .

Of the Chancery Court.

First Chancery District, BernardO'Neil, , Clerk .

2d do. do. William G.Pettus, , clkclerk .

3d do. do. David H.Conrad, , clkclerk .

4th do. do. Peter R.Garrett, , clkclerk .

Clerks of Courts.
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In the First Judicial Circuit.
County of Cole, [James S.Conway, ] clerk Circuit
court ,—resigned.
CooperRobert P.Clark, , clk.clerk circuit court .
Saline. BenjaminChambers, , clk.clerk circuit court .
Lillard, YoungEwing, , clk.clerk cir. c. & county court .
Ray, William L.Smith, , clk.clerk cir. c.circuit court & county ct.court
Chariton, Edward B.Cabell, , clk.clerk circuit and
county court .
Howard, GrayBynum, , clk.clerk circuit court , (Arm- S.Grundy, , clk.clerk county court ,
Boone, Roger NorthTodd, , clk.clerk circuit court .
In the Second Judicial Circuit.
Gasconade county, Samuel C.Owens, , clk.clerk circuit
and county courts .
Ralls, StephenGlasscock, , clk.clerk cir.circuit & county court .
Pike, LeviPettibone, , clk.clerk of the circuit court , and
Michael J.Noyes, . clk.clerk of the county court .
Lincoln, BennetPalmer, . clk.clerk cir.circuit & county court .
St. Charles, WilliamChristy, jr.clk.clerk cir.circuit & coun-
ty courts .
Montgomery, John C.Long, , clk.clerk cir.circuit court , and
Jacob L.Sharp, , clk.clerk of the county court .
Callaway, Irvine O.Hochaday, , clk.clerk cir.circuit and coun-
ty courts .
In the Third Judicial Circuit.
County of Franklin, William G.Owens, , clk.clerk circuit
and county courts .
Washington, JohnJones, , clk.clerk circuit court and
John C.Brickey, , clk.clerk county court .
Jefferson, SamuelWoodson, , clk.clerk cir.circuit court and
county courts .
St. Louis, ArchibaldGamble, , clk.clerk circuit court ,
and SilasBent, , clk.clerk county court .
Officers of St. Louis County, &c.
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In the Fourth Judicial Circuit.
County of Perry, Cornelius M.Slattery, , clk.clerk circuit
court .
St. Genevieve, ThomasOliver, , clk.clerk cir.circuit circuit and
county courts .
Madison, ThomasMosley, , clk.clerk cir.circuit court . and
NathanielCook, , clk.clerk county court .
Wayne, Solomon R.Bolen, , clk.clerk circuit court .
New Madrid, Christopher G.Houts, . clk.clerk circuit
and county courts .
Cape Girardean, JohnJuden, , clk.clerk circuit and
county courts .
Officers of St. Louis County.
Joseph C.Brown, , Sheriff .—JohnBobb, , Coroner .
RobertSimpson, , Justices of the County Court .
WilliamSullivan, , Justices of the County Court .
John C.Sullivan, , Justices of the County Court .
justices of the peace for st. louis county.
St. Louis Township.

PeterFerguson, , holds his court first Saturday of each
month.

ThompsonDouglass, , first Monday do
MosesScott, , second Saturday do
WilliamSullivan, , second Monday do
Thomas M.Guire, , fourth Tuesday do
Joseph V.Garnier, , second Wednesday

Wilson P.Hunt, —ThomasSappington, ,—Phillip
Roachblave, .

Bon-Homme Township.

J. H.Rogers, , JohnBrown, , LudwellBacon, , John
S.Ball, , ThomasMason, , HenryWalton, , Hartley
Lanham, , CalebBowles, .

St. Ferdinand Township.

R.Chitwood, , JamesBrown, , HughO'Neil, , Warren
Hunt, , Thomas R.Musick, , John T.Nash, , Frederick
Hiatt, , JohnKincade, .

***

County and Town of St. Louis.
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Constables of St. Louis County.
JabezWarner, , Constable . St. Louis Township ,
JohnSimonds, jr.deputy do St. Louis Township ,
SullivanBlood, , do. do St. Louis Township ,
Joel L.Musick, , Constable , St. Ferdinand Township .
JohnJones, , Constable , Bon Homme Township .
S.Bay, , deputy do. Bon Homme Township .
St. Louis Corporation Directory
Corporation
of the
Town of St. Louis.
Trustees.
PierreChouteau, , Chairman ,
BernardPratte, , JamesKennerly, , Robert Wash & Charles Wahrendorff .
MackyWherry, , Register .
Marie P.Leduc, . Assessor .
John C.Potter, , Lumber master .

The Office of the Corporation is kept on the north
side of south B. street, above Main-street, and is open
every morning. (Sundays excepted.) from 10 to 12
o'clock.—The Register can be seen here during of-
fice hours, and the Ordinance Book can be examined
by any person.

The Corporation Election takes place on the 6th December, annually.

Missouri Bank Directory
Bank of Missouri.
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THIS Banking Institution, under the style of
``The President, Directors and Company of the
Bank of Missouri,''—was incorporated by the Legisla-
ture of the Territory, September, 4th 1816, to continue
until the 1st February, 1888. The Banking House
is a very neat brick building, situated No. 6, North
Main-street. The following particulars are extract-
ed from the act of incorporation.

Secsection 2. The capital stock of the said bank shall
be and consist of two hundred and fifty thousand dol-
lars, in shares of one hundred dollars each, exclusive
of such shares as may hereafter be subscribed on the
part of the territory of Missouri. Provided always,
That on the application of the president and directors
of said bank, the then existing legislature may always
extend and increase the amount of stock, capital e-
state and property which said corporation may hold.

Secsection 4. No person shall be a director or presi-
dent of said bank, who is not a citizen of the United
States and of this territory and a stock holder, and a
director ceasing to be a stock holder, shall cease to
be a director. All the directors to be elected shall be
resident of the territory, every stock holder being a
citizen of the United States shall be entitled to vote
at all elections to be holden by the stock holders in
pursuance of the act of incorporation, and shall have
as many votes in proportion to the stock which he
may hoid, as follows, for one share and no exceeding
four shares, one vote each; for every two shares a-
bove four and not exceeding twenty, one vote; for

Bank of Missouri.
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every four shares above twenty and not exceeding
forty, one vote; for every six shares above forty and
not exceeding one hundred, one vote; but no person
or persons, bodies corporate or otherwise shall be en-
titled to more than fifty votes: But no stock-holder
shall be permitted to vote who has not held his stock
two calender months prior to the day of election. All
stock-holders living in the county of St. Louis shall
vote in the choice of directors by ballot, in person;
but every stock-holder living out of said county may
vote in person, by ballot or by a written ballot by him
or her subscribed, with his or her name and duly ac-
knowledged before a judge of the court, a justice of
the peace or a notary public, before whom such ac-
knowledgement shall be made; and said ballot shall
by him be sealed up and addressed to the cashier of
the said bank, and transmitted before the time of
election, shall be received and counted in the election.
No person who is not a citizen of the United States,
shall be entitled to a vote in any election of the said
corporation.

General meeting of the stockholders for the election
of Directors.—1st Monday in May, annually.

The President and Directors, shall on the first day
of each session of the Legislature of this Territory,
(or state,) lay before the said Legislature, an account
of the Bank and its funds, which said account shall
be sworn to. Shares are transferable only on the
books at the Bank. Dividends are made half yearly,
on the 1st weeks of April and October. Vacancies by
death or resignation, to be filled by the directors for
the time being. Any number of stock-holders who
shall be proprietors of not less than 500 shares, shall
have power to call a general meeting of the stock-
holders, giving at least sixty days notice.

Secsection 19. And whenever the inhabitants of any
county now established, or which may hereafter be es-
tablished by law in this territory, shall have subscrib-

Bank of Missouri.
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ed for stock in the said bank to the amount of forty
thousand dollars, and paid their proportion on that
sum into the bank, a branch bank shall within six
months thereafter be established in such county for
the purpose of discount only, and upon the same
terms and in the same manner as practised at the
bank, and to commit the management of the said of-
ficers and the marking of the said discounts to such
persons under such agreements and subject to such
regulations as they shall deem proper, not being con-
trary to law or the constitution of said bank. And in
each office of discount and deposit, there shall be vest-
ed by the president and directors double the amount
of the stock paid in by the stock-holders of the county
where such bank of discount and deposit shall be es-
tablished; Provided always, That a majority of the
stock holders of said county shall previously by writ-
ing request the establishment of such office of discount
and deposit, and the same shall be had six months be-
fore the time on which it shall be requested to estab-
lish such office of discount and deposit.

The Cashier gives security in a sum not less than
$10,000, and each of the Clerks in a sum not less than
$6,000.—No stock-holder can be appointed, either
cashier or clerk.

Secsection 27. The from and after the passage of this
act. the said Bank of Missouri hereby incorporated,
shall pay specie upon all bills and notes which may
have been or which may hereafter be drawn and
payable by the said Bank of Missouri, or by the pre-
sident and directors and cashier thereof, if there unto
required by the person or persons who may be the
holder of such bill, note or notes, under the penalty of
forfeiting at the rate of five per centum per month,
for each and every month such specie payment may
be refused, in addition to the amount of such bill,
note or notes, to be recovered in a summary way by
motion before any Justice of the Peace, or court hav-

Bank of Missouri.
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ing jurisdiction thereof in the name or for the use of
any person or persons who were the owners of said
bill, or note, or notes, at the time they were present-
ed for payment.

Secsection 28. In all suits and actions prosecuted against
the said corporation, it shall be a sufficient service of
all writs, notices or judicial process, to serve the
same upon the president or any of the directors for
the time being.

Secsection 29. If any president, director, officer or
other person holding any share or capital of the said
bank stock, shall commit any fraud or embezzlement,
touching the money or property of the said bank, he
or they shall be liable to be prosecuted in the name of
the United States by indictment, and upon conviction
thereof shall, besides the remedy that may be had by
action in the name of the president and directors of
said Bank of Missouri, for the fraud and embezzle-
ment aforesaid, forfeit to the said company all his
shares and stock in said bank.

Notes for discount must be put in before 2 o'clock,
on Mondays and Thursdays.—Discount days Tues-
days and Fridays. The Bank is open daily except
Sundays—1st January—4th July and Christmas,
from 10 o'clock, a. m. till 2, p. m.

Directors.
Thomas F.Riddick, , President .
JosephPhillipson, ,
ThomasBrady, ,
HenryVonphul, ,
JamesKennerly, ,
MichaelTesson, ,
ThomasHempstead, ,
Thomas H.Benton, , &
Angus L.Langham, .
LewisBompart, , Cashier .
Elias T.Langham, ,
Cabriel P.Cerré, , Clerks .
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Officers of the St. Louis `North Fire
Company' for the year 1821.
Capt.Captain George HKennerly, .
Lt.Lieutenant Jesse G.Lindell, .
Sty. WilsonM`Gunnegle, .
Engineers.
1st. PaulAnderson, .
2d. ElijahBeebe, .
Directors.
1st. David V.Walker, .
2d. ThomasHempstead, .
3d. AlexanderFerguson, ,
4th. EdwardTracy, ,
5th. JohnO'Fallon, ,
6th. C. S.Heinpstead, ,
Axe Men.
CharlesBusseron, ,
JamesClemens, jr.
John R.Guy, ,
JohnSmith, ,
Walter B.Alexander, ,
H.Papin, .
Hook Men.
John L.Prevonchare, ,
DavidMonnastessé, ,
WilliamHempstead, ,
John B.Sarpy, ,
William T. S.Bordon, ,
Paul M.Gratiot, ,
Ladde Men.
J. P. B.Gratiot, .
JamesBaird, .
SamuelSmyth, ,
Elias T.Langham, ,
JamesNagle, ,
GeorgeWallis, .
Property Men.
Risdom H.Price, ,
JohnM`Knight, ,
Bernard G.Farrar, ,
GregoireSarpy, ,
BernardPratte, ,
CharlesWahrend, ,
JeremiahConner, ,
HenryVonphul, ,
PierreChouteau, jr.
ThomasM`Knight, ,
WilliamRector, ,
GabrielPaul, .

The foregoing is a true statements as taken from
the record book of the North Fire Company.

W.M`Gunnegle, , Secretary .

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Officers of the `South Fire Company,'
Elected at the Formation of the Company,
August 1820, for one year.
President.
Samuel R.Ober, .
Vice-President.
John W.Honey, .
Secretary.
Wm.William G.Pettus, .
Treasurer.
JamesIrwin, .
Directors or Engineers.
Robert H.Catherwood, ,
JosephLiggett, ,
Wm.William M.O'Hara, ,
D. C.Boss, ,
JosiahBright, ,
GeorgeYoung, ,
MichaelTesson, ,
Wm.William H.Ashley, ,
Wm.William CarrLane, ,
NathanPaul, ,
JohnNicholson, ,
WilliamRenshaw, .

There are twenty-six private members whose duties
are to act in concert with the foregoing officers, when-
ever called on.

W.Renshaw, , Secretary .

Vice W. G.Pettus, , resigned.

Names of
Coins.
weight. Curr'y of
Va.K.&c.
Curr'y of
Pa.M.&c.
Federal
Value.
dwt.gr. £. S. D. £ S. D. E. D. d. c. m.
English Guinea, 5 6 1 8 0 1 15 0 0 4 6 6 7
French Guinea, 5 5 1 7 6 1 14 6 0 4 6 0 0
Johannes, 18 0 4 16 0 6 0 0 1 6 0 0 0
Half Johannes, 9 0 2 8 0 3 0 0 0 8 0 0 0
Moidore, 6 18 1 16 0 2 5 0 0 6 0 0 0
Doubloon, 16 21 4 8 0 5 12 6 1 4 9 3 3
Spanish Pistole, 4 6 1 2 0 1 8 0 0 3 7 7 3
French Pistole, 4 4 1 2 0 1 7 6 0 3 6 6 7
French Crown, 19 0 0 6 8 0 8 3 0 1 1 1 0
Spanish Dollar, 17 6 0 6 0 0 7 6 0 1 0 0 0
English Shilling, 3 18 0 1 4 0 1 8 0 0 2 2 2
3 11 0 1 2 0 1 6 0 0 2 0 0
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