Interview with Victoria Gray Adams
QUESTION 20
INTERVIEWER:

OK, OK CUT. OK, SPEAK TO ME ABOUT MRS. HAMER. WHAT DID SHE REPRESENT TO MISSISSIPPI AS A MODEL, AS A MODEL OF LEADERSHIP AND ACTIVISM? TALK TO ME ABOUT HER.

Victoria Gray Adams:

I guess, the beauty of Mrs. Hamer was, well, it was the beauty and at the same time it was the tragedy you know, of what the society deprives itself of with its double standards. I remember during the Democratic Convention we were coming from some place and somebody said, you know, its just such a shame that those people threw Mrs. Hamer out of her home just because she tried to register to vote. And I said those people did Mrs. Hamer a favor. That was the best thing that ever happened to her when they threw her out of her home. Because look, what we would never have known if they hadn't thrown her out, but because she was thrown out of her home the real, the real Fannie Lou came through and she, as you all know, was one of the most dynamic leaders in the Mississippi movement. And you know it was, it was just a delight. It was an inspiration. It was all of this to see this lady grow and unfold and become the tremendous human being that she was. If she hadn't gotten thrown off that plantation she would never have known that and neither would we. I mean we would have been deprived of all that and she inspired so many, many, many people. You know her life has just been exactly what she said: a light. And just think of the many Fannie Lous that were born, lived, and died and never knew.