Interview with Muhammad Ali
QUESTION 12
SAM POLLARD:

The day you went for induction in Houston, that day in '60, '68, '67, what were thinking that day and how did you feel?

MUHAMMAD ALI:

I felt happy because I knew I wasn't going and people didn't think I had the nerve or they don't have the nerve to buck the draft board or the government. And I almost ran there, hurried. I couldn't wait to not take the step. And the moment I did that, all the boys looked surprised. The guy who asked me to take the step looked surprised, and we went into the back room and they talked to him, told him what's going to happen. If I go, I don't have to fight, or just do exhibitions and things. I told them I still won't go because they're leading more boys to their death. And I says, "I'd rather go to jail." So they say, "You are ready?" And I never did. I fought going to the war, the world was watching, the Blacks mainly, looking, to see if I had the nerve to buck Uncle Sam, and I just couldn't wait for the man to call my name, so I wouldn't step forward. I enjoyed that day. I loved that. And after I left, say, "Look it everybody. He didn't go. He going to jail." I said, "I'd rather be in jail fed, then in Vietnam dead." You see, I know I had gone to Vietnam somebody says, "I'm going to get the nigger now." I might have got shot accidentally. I was just that controversial.

SAM POLLARD:

It's great. Let's cut.

MUHAMMAD ALI:

Because I'm a bad nigger.





MUHAMMAD ALI:

SAM POLLARD: