Interview with Dr. William Anderson
QUESTION 15
JAMES A. DEVINNEY:

DURING THE MONTHS THAT DR. KING WAS IN ALBANY, THIS WAS SORT OF THE BEGINNING OF SOME QUESTIONS THAT WERE RAISED ABOUT HIM AND HIS ABILITY AS A LEADER. HOW DID YOU PERCEIVE THAT? DID YOU THINK THAT HE WAS FAILING IN HIS LEADERSHIP ABILITY?

Dr. William G. Anderson:

Absolutely not. I think that Dr. King, was true to the spirit of the movement that he initiated in Montgomery in that the Movements were—were the activities of the people. He did not run the movement as a dictator, but more as a part of the people and acquiescing to the needs of the people and the desires of the people. At no time did Dr. King take over, if you would, the Albany Movement. He would attend the—the Board Meetings and he was a participant in the Board Meetings, and I have seen Dr. King come to those meetings with his mind apparently made up on issues. And when he engaged in the conversation with the other members of the movement, changed his mind and went the other way, or a different way.