Interview with Dr. William Anderson
QUESTION 21
JAMES A. DEVINNEY:

NOW YOU SAY, "AS LITTLE BRUTAL FORCE AS NECESSARY."

Dr. William G. Anderson:

Yeah because there were those times, I—I would have to admit that there were times when—when arrest was resisted. Of course we advised all of our followers, don't resist arrest. Go willingly. But there were those occasions when arrest would be resisted. And the only way you could get those people into jail, of course, would be to bodily take them in. So I am saying that if, to the extent that that's some brutality, I don't believe that Laurie Pritchett condoned or would have sanctioned at any time outward brutality as was experienced later. Dogs, water hoses, even beating with clubs. I don't believe he would have condoned that. Because we—we perceived him as being a man who was first, a professional policeman. Not someone who was a policeman because he was the meanest man in town. Not because he hated and despised blacks more than anyone, but we don't feel as though those were his qualifications. Fortunately for the City of Albany, they had a policeman who was a professional. He did the job that was assigned to him, but he did it in as professional a manner as he possibly could do it.