Interview with Dr. William Anderson
QUESTION 23
JAMES A. DEVINNEY:

THERE WAS A LOT OF DISAPPOINTMENT ABOUT THAT TIME BECAUSE THERE WAS NO DIRECT INVOLVEMENT FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. TALK TO ME ABOUT THAT.

Dr. William G. Anderson:

Well, needless to say we were in constant contact with the federal government. Even from the time Dr. King initially came into Albany. Contact had been made with Attorney General Bob Kennedy, and he had sort of turned us over to Burke Marshall. And when Dr. King was coming in we requested some protection for him coming into town. Laurie Pritchett, I understand was contacted by Burke Marshall, and was requested to provide security for Dr. King, and initially Laurie Pritchett said that he couldn't do it. He couldn't guarantee the safety of Dr. King coming into town. So Burke Marshall indicated, if you can't, then I'll send in enough federal marshals to do it, whereupon Laurie Pritchett decided, well maybe I can. But even we—we never at any time got any of the Justice Department officials to come in to my knowledge. Even as observers during the arrest or during the court hearings. There were FBI agents on the scene, but no one from the Justice Department that we thought would be there to protect our civil rights. We didn't have that.