Interview with Joseph Azbell
QUESTION 25
INTERVIEWER:

I WONDER IF YOU COULD DESCRIBE THAT FOR US, I'M KIND OF...

Joseph Azbell:

Merchants were so confused. They were, they had a split personality over this thing. Their business were hurting and they wanted the blacks back on the bus, but they didn't want integration or any form of integration, so they would go down and say, y'all got to do something y'all got to get these niggers back on the bus so we can do business because our business is hurting. And it was this constant thing. Well, you couldn't, with King had said that I'm going to do anything that's fair then he changed, King changed too! He went forward with integration, and a suit was filed calling for integration and a whole change came in this whole thing, a boycott, and it became a national and an international movement. We had the station-wagons, we had Nixon, Lewis, Mrs. Parks, all of them, go out all across America and speak, raise money and things were happening, and it was out of control. The negotiation was really just a thing that they went through. It was, you know, going through the procedures.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THERE'S ABOUT 100 FEET LEFT IN THE CAMERA AT THIS POINT, AND THAT'S CAMERA ROLL 135.

Joseph Azbell:

Told you what we went from six until eleven.