Interview with Peter Bailey
QUESTION 7
CARROLL BLUE:

How was he a Master Teacher?

PETER BAILEY:

He taught us. He, I, remember before when I kept talking about he taught, he taught us. He taught us--

CARROLL BLUE:

Cut Please.



About institutions? What did this man leave, this master teacher?

PETER BAILEY:

I think that he left, ah, changed minds. He left us with a new way of looking at, ah, this society. He left us with a clearer vision of as to what had to be done and we were to develop, you know, our power as a group. Ah, he talked about self determination. I mean this is still important. He talked about self defense. He talked about education. Anybody who, who say they follow brother Malcolm who do not believe in education is, is not, is simply not following him. Because he believed very strongly in education but the right kind of education. He believed in responsibility. I mean he could be very critical of Black folks, you know, with some of the irresponsible things that he felt was gong on. He, he insisted upon, ah, that we must be responsible for our own communities. He believed, as I said he had an international, he made most of us look abroad, and not just from an emotional sense. Because so many people who, who only think about Africa with very emotional, ah, they got cut off. You know he gave very emotional and very practical reasons why we had to have an international, ah, ah, a posture in international positions. He was, he was a teacher. He taught. He left, like any teacher he left behind people who then take what he has done and present on to other people to keep it and you know perpetuate it. When you think about a teacher, a master teacher and I've developed a concept of dance because we always talk about the master dancer or even a person who is a great dancer will go listen to a master dancer teach. That's the way I felt about brother Malcolm, he had that same kind of appeal, and he left that thing with us to develop, to learn, to develop our minds, to continue to move, to continue to work, to continue to try to, to organize our Black people around a, a unified concept. Not because we feel as though we can be isolated in the world to have to deal with other people, nobody believes that. That's impossible. Nobody can function in the world, but like when you deal with other people, you deal with them from a position of respect and power and, and that you're not sitting at the table asking all the time that you are there because, you know, and you can demand just as much as everybody else. Ah, he taught us that, that, ah, we must, ah, that our minds, he used to say that the revolution that we need is a revolution of the mind, that is, our minds that need to be, you know, revolutionized and that if we develop ourselves and develop our mentalities and develop our minds and then function on that level we will, we'll almost automatically do the correct thing on a political and an economic level. He could analyze the system, you know, I never could, you could never look at the American system again after listening to him. I mean even when you talk about slave, I remember he told us the three kinds of people involved with slavery. You know, you never heard about that before--