Interview with Marion Barry
QUESTION 20
INTERVIEWER:

SO WHAT YOU MEAN IS THAT IT WOULD HAVE GONE THE SAME WAY, IT JUST MADE IT EASIER BECAUSE THERE WAS SOME EXTRA MONEY THERE.

Marion Barry:

Well I think that, that the voter registration effort was a good effort and looking in retrospect I think it should have gone on ah, I think that the differences of opinion between us at that time really wanted, weren't as huge as they appeared at the time, that both those actions were very very necessary, very very helpful and very very synergistic to each other. At that time—and broke open the south and I think we're now reaping the benefits of both those movements, both the direct action movement and the voter registration movement because each learned from the other and each took on some of the same techniques from the other because they were brought to the court house as opposed to the lunch counter. There were marches to the jail after a few had been arrested for trying to register to vote just as there had been marches to the jail and after people had been arrested for trying to sit in on a lunch counter,or an integrated library or a swimming pool. So I think that was, there was some parallels in both of the movements, but it's amazing to me how many people were involved looking back in retrospect where you can't hardly get people involved to do hardly anything now, including voting. There were thousands of people in the south particularly, local people as well as students who were involved right across the board who took a lot of chances with their lives and, and who stood up and at the time I guess we didn't realize the, the significance of that, of those actions.