Interview with Marion Barry
QUESTION 4
INTERVIEWER:

UM, MAYBE, JUST TO FINISH THAT UP, YOU WERE GOING TO SAY THAT YOU WERE BETTER READY, YOU WERE…

Marion Barry:

Well we, well, we, we had, I think in terms of the overall movement, I mean I think these things were rather spontaneous to some extent; we were to except that we had had some preparation in leadership development and, and in just the whole techniques of organizing people and the whole ah area of nonviolent direct action. And so when we went in to demonstrate on that Saturday, first of all it was snowing yet we were able to muster, I don't know, two or three hundred people because people had knew, had known what we were trying to do. And so we were arrested the very first day. And we went to jail I guess that Saturday afternoon; we stayed there till probably Sunday, Sunday afternoon. And nobody got up-you know got all panic about it. We got our bond, went over to Fisk, had a big rally that night and got ready for some more action. And ah I think if you look at the people who came out of the Nashville movement as individual persons who had gone on and continued the movement arid had done other things that were connected to the impoundment of you know black people, you find probably a larger percentage of those of us who were in Nashville ah got involved in other areas of the movement either with SNCC or with SCLC or ah a few people I guess with CORE and then others er you know who are now elected officials around the country or who are doing things in their own way in the community. I think we have a broader base. It's not to say others didn't but I ah found when we went to Raleigh for instance we took ah I don't know five or six carloads of people over to Raleigh and from Tennessee and I guess the students from Nashville were sort of looked at as ones who we ought to talk to about how they did some things and ah I just feel that we were better prepared—at the moment—to do that organization and that, any other way.