Interview with Amiri Baraka
QUESTION 10
JUDY RICHARDSON:

And then what happens, you leave the party and you go to Harlem, during the assassination?

AMIRI BARAKA:

No, not that very moment.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Oh, I see, OK.

AMIRI BARAKA:

You're talking it in the apocryphal way. We organized a thing called the Black Arts up in Harlem I think, I was living downtown, I think that by the next month we had, you know, bought this building and opened the Black Arts which is a group of people, a group of Black people who were trying to put together an organization of Black artists. And so, to us, that, that, that had to be, ah, now, and it had to be done, and people needed to quit jiving about it and they need to, you know, if art really was going to serve the people, it could really help make, ah, revolution, then, those of us who thought we should get on with the work or shut up about it. That's the way I felt.