Interview with Amiri Baraka
QUESTION 27
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Well Cole--what did you think of as you see the walkout?

AMIRI BARAKA:

I didn't know what it was, I mean, you know,

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Sorry.

AMIRI BARAKA:

I didn't know. I mean I saw Coleman Young, I, I didn't even know him at the time. I just know the Michigan delegation. They were one of the largest delegations in the, ah, convention. Because one thing that was done very well is that we had proportional representation by Black people, according to the number of Black people in a particular state. And we had, you know, delegates, and those delegates were elected, and they represented Black people in those states. And all the states were represented. It was amazing to me. It was really impressive. One of the most impressive things that I've ever seen throughout the whole convention center. Of course Richard Hatcher was the mayor at that time, so we had complete access to the town, you know, to the police and to the institutions and seeing that whole hall set up like that, with you know, the banners for each State, Black people being represented, passionately arguing for these points. I think it filled us all with, with a sense of deep, of self respect, knowing that, ah, ultimately the only thing keeping us down was the mad man's gun. That it wasn't anything else, that we knew exactly what we wanted, you know, and, ah, all we needed to develop was how to get there, you know.