Interview with Amiri Baraka
QUESTION 32
JUDY RICHARDSON:

But then you go to the delegations, what happens that night?

AMIRI BARAKA:

Well, I have to convince them not to, ah--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Sorry, if you could mention it.

AMIRI BARAKA:

I mean I went to the delegations to try to find out if, ah, how people wanted to handle that. People obviously were angry at the way it was handled, ah, the electoral politicians had certain things that they refused to deal with. I mean they no longer saw it as their constituencies although that was their line that it was their constituencies that they were reacting to. They were really reacting to their relationship with the United States government in some kind of way. Certainly the lines, they would find embarrassing. The NAACP disassociated themselves from the convention, the day before the convention opened, we hadn't said a word. Roy Wilkins came out with an editorial saying he wanted to have nothing to do with us, you know what I mean. Ah, but the electoral politicians who had to be drawn in it because we drew them into it, we knew what we were doing,I mean the activists, the nationalists, we drew the electoral politicians into it because they wanted a national strategy and there was no other way to go except the way we were proposing. But once they get in there on the floor some of the questions they came up with were controversial, the thing on busing, the thing on Israel, for instance, the thing on the unions, the whole thing about a Black political party. Jesse Jackson, for instance, got up and, and, ah resolved that we should do, you know, declare, Black political party. Percy Sutton got up and talked about a, a, ah, a Black Presidential Campaign to nationalize the votes, we can see which way won out, Percy Sutton's won out.