Interview with Amiri Baraka
QUESTION 34
JUDY RICHARDSON:

So, why does the idea of a third party not get endorsed by the, by the convention?

AMIRI BARAKA:

Well, there was a furious struggle over it. It came up

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry.

AMIRI BARAKA:

--in many different ways and the idea of a third party did come up repeatedly. The idea of a third party, either a Black political party, variations of that, it came up. But you see as I said, the electoral politicians in the committee remained in the Democratic Party, some to the Republican Party. The Republican Party, they were opposed to that, you see. Jesse Jackson, as I said, came up with the idea. He supported the idea of a Black political party, ah, the Black bourgeoisie, on the other hand, Percy Sutton came up with the idea of, of nationalizing the Black vote by running a Black candidate, which of course, is an idea whose time has come for the last eight years with Jesse Jackson. Now Jesse's taken that line, which was Percy Sutton's line. But I think it was the electoral politicians, the Black caucus, ah, that militated[SIC], you know, and, and the various kind of electoral politicians who were connected. One of the parties, the mainly Democrat, who always militated[SIC] against an independent party because they always saw their particular interests hooked up with the Democrats or the Republicans. It's still the same way.