Interview with Amiri Baraka
QUESTION 38
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Tell me what you do then? What do you do?

AMIRI BARAKA:

What do I do when I talk to them?

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Yeah, no, what do you do when you decide I've got to keep this from unraveling, what do you do?

AMIRI BARAKA:

Well, you know--


JUDY RICHARDSON:

We're going back in the sense that it might unravel and what you specifically do about warring delegations--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

--trying to deal with what their concerns are. OK.


JUDY RICHARDSON:

OK, if you can describe going around to each of the delegations to try and keep it from unraveling.

AMIRI BARAKA:

Well, it was a question of a lot of people felt, ah, ah, that they had really just been dismissed, and deprived of their democracy by way of the elected officials through Diggs, were, you know handling this particular question. I don't remember what the question was, was it the question of busing or the question of Israel or the question of Black Party, one of those things because they were the ones that were really, you know, controversial. But a lot of people felt that that wasn't right. That the things should be struggled out, and, and, you know, the elected officials were using their, ah, slick parliamentary manner, and, and the fact that they were organized, to try to keep things from getting said and resolved that would embarrass them in terms of their relationship with the Democratic Party and the media and so forth and so on. Although they would always cite their constituency, who we were supposed to be in the first place, as the reason that they didn't. So I was in, in the main trying to, ah, ah, discuss with people, you know, what they thought, how they were going to approach it, ah--