Interview with Amiri Baraka
QUESTION 7
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Talk about, describe what you're doing and how you felt when you hear that Malcolm is assassinated.

AMIRI BARAKA:

Well, I mean for me, it was a declaration of war. I mean I felt that it was like, ah, open--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Sorry.

AMIRI BARAKA:

You know, Malcolm's assassination for me was a declaration of war. I mean I took it as a, as a straight out, you know, attack. I mean really a kind of open attack that could only be met with some kind of, ah, equal attack. I mean, I don't think there was anything that made me as, ah, I mean seriously outraged, you know, in the sense, not only of, of being angry at the murderers but of losing, you know what I mean, of, of having lost, you know, some kind of great person and, and, and being outraged at the sense of, of the forces who could conspire to do that. That these people thought that they could actually make you submit to them. That, that, they could make Black people submit to them, that they would kill anybody and, you know, the only thing I think that did for me and a lot of people was strengthen our resolve. That, you know--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

OK cut. Sorry we just have to, ah--