Interview with James Bash
QUESTION 16
INTERVIEWER:

WONDER IF YOU COULD GIVE US YOUR THOUGHTS—THIS IS A, JUST AN OPINION OUESTION—WHETHER THE PEOPLE IN FARMVILLE WERE ACTING IN ANY SENSE OUT OF STATES' RIGHTS, YOU KNOW THAT SORT OF CONSTITUTIONAL LEGAL QUESTION, OUT OF A PURE RACISM, THEY SIMPLY DIDN'T WANT ANYTHING TO DO WITH BLACK CHILDREN OR, OR WHAT?

James Bash:

Well, I don't think, I don't think that there was any deep seated racism per se, as we define it today. I think that there was a resistance to change, popularly known as, if it ain't broke don't fix it. Things were working all right for them, that is for white citizens and they were in control and so what else is wrong, kind of unwilling to listen to anything that was wrong since it was working so good. The football team was winning, the basketball team was winning, you know what else could you want? Any rate I don't think that there was too much concern about states' rights and some other things it's just that at the local level of the masses of the white citizens felt that it was just wrong to change the way we're doing things.