Interview with Unita Blackwell
QUESTION 10
INTERVIEWER:

WOULD IT, WHAT DID THE VOTE, WHY WAS IT SO—WHAT DID THE VOTE MEAN?[unintelligible].

Unita Blackwell:

Well I—the white people knew what it meant. The black folks didn't know that much what it meant. I was only told when I started off that if I registered to vote that I would have food to eat and a better house to stay in, 'cause the one I was staying in was so raggedy you could see anywhere and look outdoors. That I would have, my child would have a better education. And at that particular point, our children only went to school two to three months out of the year. That was what we were told, it was the basic needs of the people. And for the whites, they understood it even larger than that in terms of political power, and we hadn't even heard that word, political power, because it wasn't even taught in the black schools. We didn't know it was such thing as a Board of Supervisors and what they did, and School Board members, and what they did and even the Mayor. I mean my mother has never thought in terms that, that I would, you know, ever be anything. So nobody's, you know, never thought about any of those things.