Interview with Unita Blackwell
QUESTION 14
INTERVIEWER:

OK, SO WHAT WE'RE GOING TO DO IS BEGIN TO TALK AGAIN ABOUT COURAGE, AND YOU WERE TELLING ME ABOUT NOTHING FROM NOTHING, AND WHAT THAT, WHAT THAT MEANS IN TERMS OF THEN TAKING ACTION, SO [unintelligible] TALKING ABOUT PEOPLE IN MISSISSIPPI, OK?

Unita Blackwell:

People in Mississippi, especially black people, when we talked about courage and where do we get our courage from in the beginning of the movement, we—I would always say that nothing from nothing leaves nothing. And we didn't have nothing. And I guess our courage came out of—because we didn't have nothing, that we couldn't lose nothing. But we wanted something for ourselves and for our children. And so we took a chance with our lives** because I said, we was already, you know walking around dead, because we didn't have a life. We just was existing. And they bought it, I mean, you know, when we would get out and talk about this, say, that's right. I mean, really and it came up out of that. It came up out of the necessities of life that we were missing. And so the courage came from that. Another thing a lot of people that we talked to—'cause I was teaching Sunday school at the time, when the guy came in talking about what we were going to do around voter registration, and God helps those who help themselves, and that's one of the things we kept talking about in organizing people to go out to try to register to vote. It was all organized around the basic things that we understood, like the people in Mississippi Delta knows a lot about God and church what the Bible say, and we saw it as our strength. And we didn't have nothing, you know, and so that's the way we went at it, nothing from nothing leaves nothing. And ever what we do, we going to be better off.