Interview with Unita Blackwell
QUESTION 17
INTERVIEWER:

SO WHAT WE WERE TALKING ABOUT, WE WERE TALKING ABOUT THAT PEOPLE HERE IN MISSISSIPPI, THEY UNDERSTOOD THAT [unintelligible] NECESSARILY…

Unita Blackwell:

Now people outside of the state doesn't really understand like what happened to Medgar Evers, you know, it saddened all of us, and—but we know death is always around. With the struggle that, that we were in, that it was always the chance that your life was the ultimate price, And that had happened to us all the time. I mean people were going to jail, people were being beat, people were being killed, and some of them were just being killed. We know about—I know about people that's been killed, and they wasn't doing voter registration work. They just was black, and said something wrong to a white person—or lift up their head and tried to be a person. And they tried to make them put their hat on their head and, you know, and take it off and all this kind of stuff, and beat them to death. So we, we live in that and it was something that I guess every time one died, we reinforced it by making sure that we gonna make it.