Interview with Unita Blackwell
QUESTION 35
INTERVIEWER:

NOW WAS IT THAT YOU WERE LOOKING FOR SEATS OR WERE YOU LOOKING FOR RECOGNITION? WAS THE, DID THE SEAT REPRESENT RECOGNITION OR?

Unita Blackwell:

Well, one of the things that when we would sit in, we had the big wheels to come and talk to us. We said big wheels. We talking about heads of organizations at that time, the black organizations, that would come and talk to us and talk about you know, why don't we take maybe a few seats, maybe a couple of seats. That would show that we did challenge and that we did get something. And we came back to that saying again, nothing from nothing leaves nothing. And if we go back with two seats, to us, it don't mean nothing. And the seats represented that we, as a people, because, see, votes was tied to more than just saying, we going down to vote. Vote was tied to, is our children going to be better educated? Votes was tied to, is we going to live in better houses? Have a job? Or, even where are we going to stay? Because we were going to be thrown off the plantations. And you know, when we got back to Mississippi, you know, we were going to be put off, and people were. When we got back, you know, folks was out of a job. I haven't had a job since 1964 by the white folks' standards. They took away the, the job. And they going to make sure that we were not going to get those jobs. That's what we were dealing with, when we talk about seats. Seats was our livelihood, it was our—

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