Interview with Fred Black
QUESTION 22
LOUIS MASSIAH:

Let me go back to a question I asked before, I mean you said you were influenced you couldn't not help but be influenced by what was going on. It must have had some stronger affects on you when you didn't go to meetings where other radical students started to make strong and heavy decisions.

FRED BLACK:

Not participating in some of the decision-making,ah, processes that involved the whole protest movement was a conscious decision. I remember feeling in some ways like you were giving up or giving in to others when you might have been able to make a contribution. But I had decided at the beginning of the second semester of senior year that I just wasn't gonna get involved in planning those events and activities because I didn't believe that was the solution, so I basically, stayed away and I didn't feel one bit guilty about staying away, I felt a little bit saddened, I think, that as the protest movement grew, there was less opportunity for multiple voices to be heard and differing viewpoints to be considered; I think that the party line got to be very narrow.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

OK, cut.


FRED BLACK:

How's that?