Interview with Jerred Blanchard
QUESTION 14
PAUL STECKLER:

I want to finish up going back just in terms of how you felt with the reaction after you took that vote. How did you feel?

JERRED BLANCHARD:

My reaction after that vote was, ah, one of calm really. The same way I felt after I made up my mind that I had the guts to march. I mean, ah, nobody wants to step out front in these things and I sure didn't. I'm a follower, I'm no leader, man. I, I didn't want to get mixed up in any of this business. But I had no choice. I could not live with myself and vote against settlement of that strike. And I knew that very clearly by the middle of February. There was never any doubt in my mind after that that sooner or later I had to do it. I had to vote with the Blacks. I had to vote with the Civil Rights Movement and I had to vote against a lot of things that, ah, I guess I had been identified with prior to that time. And after I'm, after I cast my ballot it was kind of like the burden was lifted. I could look at the face in the mirror every morning and I didn't feel so bad about seeing it.

PAUL STECKLER:

Stop it for a second.