Interview with Unita Blackwell
QUESTION 2
JUDY RICHARDSON:

And then the sense of power, um, that suddenly you as a Black mayor had power that previously had been held by Whites, how did that feel? in terms of being able to do certain things.

UNITA BLACKWELL:

Well, I think that, that at first it'd have to grow on you. That, that you, that this has really happened. That you have, ah, that, ah, power to, to do some things. Um, coming through the Civil Right(s) Movement, I had learned about what, what you could do. But for me to be in this position was, a, a, a, different feeling to, to know that I had the reign to go and, and get this done. I was always the advocator[SIC] of making sure that other folks got it done. But now, as we say, um, I was the, ah, power at city hall. Ah, we used to say, "Well, what can you do with city hall?" And so we'd protest against it or whatever, but I, I am now city hall, so, what, what, what, what will I do with this power?