Interview with Herbert X. Blyden
QUESTION 13
INTERVIEWER:

How did you react when you heard, personally, how did you react personally when you heard about George Jackson's death?

HERB BLYDEN:

Well, with anger.

INTERVIEWER:

--when I heard about George Jackson's death.

HERB BLYDEN:

Because of the George Jackson's death, you know, the anger had built up in me to the point where I was ready to explode myself. But after having considered the turmoils and the trials and tribulation that this strong brother had gone through only to be murdered in the manner in which he was he murdered, I said if he can endure and still be able to reach out even in death as he had, ah, we could take it from that point ah, and proceed to try to bring some other diverse elements together. But at first my reaction was, you know, an eye for an eye, much as, ah, the bible had spoken of. But I maintained my calm for the most part, but George, I think his overall demeanor affected me to the point where I was able to carry on and help to bring some people, some people together to deal with some issues.

INTERVIEWER:

Could you just give it to me one more time because I sort of jumped on top of your question, answer. How did you react to George's death?

HERB BLYDEN:

George Jackson's death I think created anger, frustration, and it, for a moment, wanted me to actually lash out at something or someone, ah, preferably to society and those forces that be that had taken his life from us. But in realizing that the brother had not died in vain and he would have wanted us to continue with the work that he had tried to do from behind the prison walls, ah, we maintain our cool and I maintained mine and tried to, ah, continue to struggle to bring the forces together and move on for betterment of the society from within the walls and from without the walls.

INTERVIEWER:

Good. Fine. Let's cut a second.