Interview with Herbert X. Blyden
QUESTION 14
INTERVIEWER:

So, what was it about George that, I mean, that you remembered as you thought about his death?

HERB BLYDEN:

George Jackson's death, I think, impacted on me in such a way that, ah, even Mar--Dr. King's death did not impact on me because while Dr. King strived for something from a religious perspective, George Jackson came from something which had an inner and yet an outer. I remember his going to court in shackles, and the brother would stand erect, you know, proud Black man that he was. And they had not broken his spirit, and these are things that Dr. King and Malcolm talked about, the breaking down of, of the Black man's spirit. I remember his "in-cell" program, with the exercising, the push ups, and then when he comes out it was like he was in another world while he was still in the confines of the belly of the monster. So, I think what I had to do at that point was to show that we can be strong even during trials and tribulations, much as George was strong to the death. So, as a result of them taking George away from us, it made us that much stronger, I think.

INTERVIEWER:

Good, good. Sto--