Interview with Herbert X. Blyden
QUESTION 24
INTERVIEWER:

Brother Herb, if you could just go back to that day, that Monday, what happened that morning, what you saw and what you felt as the state troopers came in and correction officers came in to retake the yard?

HERB BLYDEN:

Monday, September 13, 1971 was indeed a blue Monday. It was a cloudy, overcast day and we remember clearly addressing the crowd and apprising them of the urgency of the situation at hand. And, ah, to a man, with one exception, everybody decided to stay in the yard. I'll never forget this one White guy came up to me and said "I don't want to be out here." And I told him then, "Stand behind me." And he was the only one of 1,281 men who said they didn't want to be in the yard on September 13th. Fifteen minutes after that man said that, the helicopters came over and asked us to surrender, place our hands on our heads, we will not be hurt. And some of the men started to do that only to hear tear gas, pepper gas, shotguns, rifles. And it was a--again pandemonium broke out because some of them were indeed surrendering. And the chaos that was created as a result of this mass shooting into the yard I think to this, to me created the pandemonium that led to the massacre in the yard.

INTERVIEWER:

Cut.

HERB BLYDEN:

See, I can't--