Interview with Willie Bolden
QUESTION 3
JACKIE SHEARER:

Was it difficult for the union to carry signs saying Maynard's word is garbage?

WILLIE BOLDEN:

It, it was difficult. It was difficult because we really believed Maynard's heart was in the right place. However, we had no other choice. When a garbage worker goes to the store to buy a loaf of bread, he has to pay the same amount that the mayor has to pay, the city council have to pay, any department head has to pay. So what we were saying to Maynard and to the city fathers, look, our folks are the lowest on the totem pole. When we pull into a gas sta--station, they don't say because you work for the city government you pay X number of dollars for gas, whatever the price of gas, that's what you pay. So our position was, Maynard, love you, we believe your heart is in your right place, but you gonna have to get your folk and you gonna make them do what is right. And we made up in our minds, even though we had a lot of respect for Maynard, that we were not going to exchange a White slave master for a Black slave master. And that's not to say that we believed Maynard was trying to be a Black slave, slave master, but what we were sending, ah, the message we were sending to him was we were not going to do that. And whatever it took to get, for our people, what they rightfully deserved, we were gonna do that, including a strike.

JACKIE SHEARER:

OK, cut.