Interview with Herb Boyd
QUESTION 1
SAM POLLARD:

First question is, We're going back to 1967. How did the police relate to the Black community in Detroit in 1967?

HERB BOYD:

In 1967 you know you had a situation in Detroit where the police was moving into like a Garrison city occupied army situation. It wasn't at all unlike the previous years there when you had the big four out there but it was in a transitional period when the big three was coming into power. This is when they had three uniform cops patrolling the neighborhoods. What I remember mostly is that police brutality was rampant at that time. We had one incident after another. From one end of the city to another people were like being shot down. We had incidents on the East side. There were a couple of incidents on the West side of Detroit at that time and it wasn't unusual to see that the cops coming into neighborhoods and just arbitrarily grabbing people you know without any kind of provocation and slam, slam us up against the wall. Ask us for our identification. Where you going? What you been doing? Any kind of suspicion whatsoever would be 'cause for them to just go ahead and accost you and ask you--show some identification. So it had a kind of an occupied army feel at that time.