Interview with Herb Boyd
QUESTION 33
SAM POLLARD:

When did the rebellion stop and what do you think it was important for the community to do when it did stop?

HERB BOYD:

By Wednesday of that week I thought that the rebellion had pretty much run it's course--

HERB BOYD:

By Wednesday of that week I thought that the rebellion had pretty much run it's course. It had kind of run out of steam, armed forces, the federal troops, the National Guard, the police, reinforced cops had pretty much put a cap on things: that was about Wednesday of that week. I felt it was just be futile to be out there in the streets. I mean the curfew had been enforced so it was kind of limited activity in the street. It was pointless and stupid to be talking about being out looting any further. Pretty much all the stores had been ripped off anyway, but that kind of armed presence was enough to stifle all kind of activity and the possibility of further insurrection. The other concern I felt at that time was that we begin to channel--personally I would have to channel--this anger and frustration toward more constructive, more positive goals. That we begin to organize this community that we begin to do something about the kind of continu--we know that the armed resistance was gone, that some of these same factors would become back into force again: we'd have to deal with unemployment, we'd have to deal with the kind of price gouging that was going on, the kind of question of housing in our community, so it was now time to organize, time to rebuild our community.