Interview with Harry Briggs, Sr. and Eliza Briggs
QUESTION 31
INTERVIEWER:

YOU WERE TELLING US ABOUT—HARRY WAS TELLING US ABOUT SOME OF THE THINGS THAT HAPPENED AFTER THE PETITION WAS SIGNED. PEOPLE GOT FIRED. CAN YOU TELL US SOME OF THE THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO YOU AND PEOPLE YOU KNEW?

Eliza Briggs:

Well, it happened to me. I was working at Summerton Motel, and this man, he work us, Greenborough, he work us real good. And the White Council of Summerton, I think they call it the White Council, they came down there and told him that, if he didn't fire the women who signed the petition, that they would close the business down. They won't let the trucks come in and deliver. So then he called us in, and asked all who that signed the petition, would we take our name off the petition in order to work? After all, we had to pay $5 to take our name off the petition. I told him, no, I didn't want to do that, because we be hurting the children, and I rather give my job up, and keep my name on there. So in about two week's time, I was fired. Not only me, the rest of them who had anything to do with the petition, they all was fired. Annie Gibson was fired, and many more, during that time too. They—a lot of colored people on the white man place—they made them move, because they signed the petition. So they didn't have, well I guess they find a place to go. But when you live on white man place, partly all your life, and when you sign a petition for your children to do better, they told them, said, "Well you got to go. Else take the name off the petition." And many of the people decided they did not want to take the name off, and they did not take the name off.