Interview with Harry Briggs, Sr. and Eliza Briggs
QUESTION 32
INTERVIEWER:

WHY DO YOU THINK THE WHITE PEOPLE IN SUMMERTON SO OPPOSED WHAT YOU WERE DOING? WHY DO YOU THINK THAT THEY WERE SO HARD ON YOU WHEN YOU SIGNED THE PETITION? DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA ABOUT THAT?

Eliza Briggs:

The only thing I can think of is that, I guess they had their way a long, long time. Colored people had to do what they say do. And they feel like the black people ever get a chance, that they'll be able to do something what they had always want to do. I had a cousin came down once from Chicago. We went into the drugstore. She asked for a Coke, told her, "We don't sell Coke here." In Chicago, she didn't know the difference. So then she asked, "What the Coke machine doing up there." He said, "Well, we don't sell black people Coke, our drugstore." So at the time I was young, and I didn't realize, but still, after we get older, we realize that this is it, now. Our children should have more opportunity. They go to college, university, anything that they want to. I remember going to Sumter, the Kresge. And you couldn't even go in there and sit to the counter, to buy anything. You had to take it in your hand and come on outside. So today, well, most of the time now, you can go any place you want to go, sit down and eat, drink, hotel, any other places. Now, you can go on the bus, the train, especially on the bus. You almost take the front seat. One time before, only one seat, and that be the back seat.