Interview with Harry Briggs, Jr.
QUESTION 19
INTERVIEWER:

I WANT TO ASK YOU AGAIN ABOUT THE BLACK SCHOOLS, BUT WHEN YOU GIVE YOUR ANSWER JUST SAY IT A LITTLE MORE SLOWLY. IF YOU COULD JUST DESCRIBE TO US AGAIN WHAT THE BLACK SCHOOLS WERE LIKE AND WHAT THAT WAS LIKE FOR YOU AS A CHILD.

Harry Briggs, Jr.:

The black school—it was full and our building was made out of wood. So a lot of the cracks was in it. A lot of the holes was in it, and we have to make our fire by coals. And once our coals run out, we have to go in the woods across the street to chop our wood and make our own heat. And so which… where the white had brick school. I forgot what they were run by, coal or—had to been coal—I don't think there was no gas then at the time. Maybe gas, I don't know. So bad our school was, only—say only twelve rooms—one for each grade. And it had one little small cafeteria, and had the principal in one little—called the principal's office. And if you do something bad, they send you out in the hallway and the principal step out and looks down the hall. He calls you up to his office. What you did wrong? And that's—they punish you also, and they send you out to chop some more wood or cut the hedges on the school yard.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THAT WAS WONDERFUL. ROOM TONE.