Interview with Herbert Brownell, Jr.
QUESTION 16
INTERVIEWER:

WHY WASN'T HE MORE VOCAL FOR HIS SUPPORT OF THE DECISION?

Herbert Brownell, Jr.:

I think he felt, I think President Eisenhower felt that, that for him to be vocal in support of the Brown decision uh, was, would be a mistake so far as getting affirmative response of the American people when the showdown came. It was obvious that there was going to be a showdown, because shortly after the Brown decision, uh, a majority, I believe an overwhelming majority of uh, the governors and the senators and the congressmen from the south, the southern states joined in what they called a southern manifesto which was to resist the Brown decision, by all means short of uh, violence. And uh, that was an important segment of the American public and Eisenhower's position as President was that he had to work with that group in the American scene as well as those who were for, much more affirmatively supporting the uh, the Brown decision and that his job was not exactly to be a referee but was to keep in a position where he could work with both groups. And of course it turned out that that was um, an important element when the showdown came at Little Rock. And the southern governors of moderate persuasion uh, sided with him as against Governor Faubus.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

CAMERA ROLL 174 HAS ROLLED OUT WE'RE GOING TO 175 CONTINUATION OF INTERVIEW.