Interview with Dr. John O. Brown
QUESTION 2
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

OK, now, we'll start: Tell me about, going to college and med school and taking it through that story about the German friend.

DR. JOHN O. BROWN:

Well, I was, I was originally from Oklahoma which was a segregated state. Of course you didn't have the number of Blacks in that state as you did in the deep south, such as Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia and Florida. But then I went to college at the University of Wisconsin. And I'd always intended to be a doctor but then I was thrown a little off base because of the good treatment and the equal and fair treatment that was given to Blacks at Wisconsin, which was considered one of the most liberal schools in the country at that time. And I went off on the military end because I was the first Black that was admitted to advanced ROTC. And my friends were telling me, they need you in the army. The military needs Black officers. You'll be a colonel and we'll still be second lieutenants. So, I was thrown off base then, went into the army for three and a half years, was shot up over in Italy with the 92nd Division. I was hit by a German mortar shell. After the war was over and I was admitted medical school in Tennessee, I, ah, took a post-graduate training course in ophthalmology at the University of Illinois. And in that class was a German boy who had fought against this country in World War II and his unit was assigned to the same area that I was in Italy And we, as we talked to each other, found out that, ah, he was on one hill and I was on the opposite hill so we were probably shooting at each other. But he could come over here, after fighting against this country, to enjoy our educational benefits--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Ah, we have to stop.



DR. JOHN O. BROWN:

OK, there was a German fellow--