Interview with Linda Bryant-Hall
QUESTION 11
JUDY RICHARDSON:

What did it mean to you as member of CORE? I mean you where kind of the outside of what was going on in the traditional kind of movement?

LINDA BRYANT HALL:

Well, you know with CORE, we looked--we were the Congress of Racial Equality. And, a lot of times, our goals, too, were ah, integration. But, we also wanted to say, not only integration, but, ah, in fact that was just the by-product, I guess, of what our goals were. But, what we really wanted people to understand, is that Blacks wanted power; we wanted, ah, ah, the power to make some decisions on our own; the power to decide where we were going to go and what direction we were going in. And, when we said power, that meant not only did that statement go for White America, but, it went for Dr. King also. Ah, you can find yourself, if you are going to come in and be a total power in a situation. You can find that you can be oppressive, also. Ah, I don't think he intended to do that. But, we felt suppressed in many cases. Our views were, ah, were not accepted with Dr. King and so we felt Dr. King was almost doing like, ah, ah, the White community was doing us; and, it was hurtful.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Cut. That's interesting.


LINDA BRYANT HALL:

Am I? Am I starting all over?

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Yes. All over on Stokley too? Yeah.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Lets see if we can make it one, OK, 'cause she said there were two things--