Interview with Linda Bryant-Hall
QUESTION 12
JUDY RICHARDSON:

When you first heard Stokely say, "Black Power", what did you feel and what did that mean to you--in the sense that it might have even connected to what you had heard Malcolm talk about.

LINDA BRYANT HALL:

OK. When I heard Stokely Carmichael say, "Black Power", and I saw the picture of him standing there with his fist raised, he had such an--he drew such an excitement and an energy that came to me--and those others who were in CORE ah, at the time--that we wanted to say, yes, we--this is what we want; we support you in this; and, we don`t want to be ashamed of wanting "Black Power"--is there something wrong with wanting "Black Power"? No, there isn't. And, we would like to be able to say that to people; I mean he came with the same kind of energy that Malcolm X came with. And, that's what we liked--not that we wanted to ah, overthrow our government (and there may have been some who wanted to); and not that we wanted to do anything violent; in fact, I was one who followed Dr. King's ah, methodology. But, I also wanted Dr. King to be a little more forceful about what it is--Sorry you told me not to say Dr. King.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

That's OK. It wasn't bad as matter fact, it's a shame .