Interview with Linda Bryant-Hall
QUESTION 13
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Um? Give me a sense of what it meant to you as a member of CORE; you had talked about what you had wished Dr. King would do, and what you were hearing from Malcolm, as well.

LINDA BRYANT HALL:

OK. Um, being in CORE--you know CORE is not a religious bases organization. And, therefore, we did have a lot of people, also, who were not necessarily church people, ah, who didn't even believe in churches, were adamantly against it. But, what we did have in common, with everybody in the movement, is that we wanted Blacks to, to move ahead, to move forward. And, we were going pretty slow. Ah, we decided that what we needed to do, was to give it--give this whole thing a little more energy. And, when Stokely Carmichael decided that he was going to dare to say, "Black Power"; that was like a sign to all of us across the country, ah, OK it's OK now--you can say it, it's out there and open. Let's deal with that. And, Dr. King, when he decided that that was going to be something that we should hush a little bit, ah, I think that made it even more attractive to us, ah, the fact that somebody would tell you not to harp on it too much, to ah play it low key; ah, in fact, we decided then that, yeah,that must be the direction that we need to go into, because we're getting too many people who are telling us to go gradually, and to go slow.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Cut

LINDA BRYANT HALL:

I'm not saying that right--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Think about it a second. Because, what you were saying originally was that----and so you were hoping that you would be a little bit


JUDY RICHARDSON:

So you don't have to remember anything. Just however you want to play it.