Interview with Linda Bryant-Hall
QUESTION 8
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Give me a sense of problems you had with Dr. King basing his movement in the church, as he did in the south.

LINDA BRYANT HALL:

OK. The problem with Dr. King wanting to base his movement here, in Chicago, only in the church was a big problem for us. In Chicago--as I said--there are people who ah, are very diversified. And, some people in Chicago didn't even believe in churches, didn't believe in God; I mean, they were avowed atheists; and, for someone to come in now and ask them to come into the church, ah, and follow his movement through that mechanism it didn't wash so well with a lot of people. Ah, and then too, the churches might have--in Chicago--represented something different from what they did in the south. In Chicago, the churches, many of the Black churches--not all of them certainly--many of them ah, had very close connections to the political machine. The political machine supported many of the churches. I mean they did so much as buy the pews where the people set. They provided the church with a store front. They provided the minister, in some cases, with a salary. Ah, so for him, now, to turn to the community people who had been fighting against this kind of set-up, and say, come and follow me. You know, it just wouldn't go over.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Cut. Lovely.