Interview with Reverend Will Campbell
QUESTION 14
INTERVIEWER:

WHY DON'T YOU START ABOUT, DRIVING THROUGH, AND LISTENING TO SERMONS AND WHAT YOU WOULD HEAR AND WHAT IT MEANT TO YOU.

Rev. Will D. Campbell:

Well, after the visit with, with John I wanted to go and see the students in various hospitals. There was a black St. Jude's, I believe was the name of the Catholic operated hospital on the edge of town where the freedom riders had been taken, black and white. And some of them were in critical condition and I went to visit them and, course I was lost and scared and just driving at times, aimlessly around the city, at 11 o'clock on Sunday morning…and here was a city that had been, the day before, in utter chaos. And people were being clubbed and beaten and the city was in turmoil, and not one preacher, and I kept moving the knob and listening to this sermon and that one, over the hour or so time there, and you might as well have been on a different planet, you know, that there was no mention of this in sermons, no prayer for forgiveness, to say nothing of deliverance. And so that this, this sharp cleavage between what was happening in the black churches of Montgomery where mass meetings were going on every night and, I am certain that if a black preacher had been on the radio that day there would have been mention of this, both in prayer, in praise, in homily, and in psalm. But the white church—there was no mention of this, because it is controversial, and there's one thing sacred in any institution and that's harmony.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THAT WAS A ROLL, CAMERA ROLLOUT ON CAMERA ROLL 319, WE ARE NOW GOING TO CAMERA ROLL 320.