Interview with Reverend Will Campbell
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

OK NOW, GOING, GETTING INTO THE MOVEMENT AND SAY LOOBY'S HOUSE, LOOBY'S HOUSE IS BOMBED. WHAT HAPPENED TO THE CITY AT THAT POINT? WHAT, HOW DID PEOPLE RESPOND?

Rev. Will D. Campbell:

Mr. Z. Alexander Looby, who was a great man, a black attorney, conservative politically, a Lincoln Republican of many years, no one could accuse him of being a wild eyed radical politically. And when his house was bombed or dynamited, I think it, it solidified especially the black community, and it enraged a segment of the white community in a fashion that nothing else had. When you had the hundred or hundreds of black students coming down and sitting in at the Woolworth stores and so on, all of the five and dime stores, and department stores, that was one thing, because students are supposed to be irresponsible, you know, and wild eyed, and so you just kind of shrug that off. And if the police get a little rough, you know, and over zealous and throwing—and pack thirty into a paddy wagon that's designed for eight—well, after all, you know, they're just, they're students. But this elderly man who had been a citizen, a lawyer, a councilman and so on, over the years, and when his house is in a rubble, this did outrage a lot of people. Now, I would have to acknowledge, much as I would like to say, being afflicted with this incurable skin disease called lightness, that it solidified the white community to go out and join the marches—it did not. But there was the the mass march to City Hall, and there was a white Mayor who came out there and who with considerable prodding from that brilliant and beautiful leader named Diane Nash, who kept pushing him—but, Mr. Mayor, you are our Mayor, sir, do you think that segregation is morally defendable? And he eventually had to say, I do not. Now that, in my judgment, was the turning point. That encounter was a turning point. So you had a white Mayor of a leading city reflecting on this alleged progressive characteristic of the city. And once he says this and then you have a leading black citizen with his house dynamited, now it goes back to the dynamiting, so that whoever set off that dynamite or bomb blast, did more to integrate the lunch counters and the department stores in Nashville, I think, than all the sit-ins combined

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

[overlap] THAT IS A CAMERA ROLL OUT. WE ARE NOW ON A FRESH ROLL CAMERA ROLL NUMBER 319, 319[overlap]