Interview with Hodding Carter III
QUESTION 9
INTERVIEWER:

HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE BRIEFLY THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CITIZENS' COUNCIL AND THE KLAN?

Hodding Carter III:

There was no Klan to have a relationship with in most of that period. The Klan in its last incarnation in Mississippi had vanished after World War II when it briefly flared and went away. The Citizens' Council in fact was often sold as a way to prevent the lower order of whites from taking the initiative in anti-integration movement. It was seen as a way for good people to stop bad people from doing things which would be embarrassing or perhaps even evil. A—the Klan did not begin to emerge again in Mississippi from its hibernation until the freedom summer and the publicity attending it in the 1964 period. It was the drumbeat of publicity about the freedom summer and the buildup to it that suddenly sparked, particularly in southwest Mississippi, the reemergence of the Klan, but that was years later. The Klan simply was a nonexistent or negligible force in the fifties and early sixties, and that's dead behind me.