Interview with Hodding Carter III
QUESTION 12
INTERVIEWER:

WHAT ABOUT THE SELF-IMPOSED LIMITATIONS ON SOMEBODY WHO WAS A MODERATE? WERE THERE THINGS YOU JUST WOULDN'T…

Hodding Carter III:

Look, there was a joke that Dad told all the time about what he hoped he would be able to say when we'd passed through it and gotten to the other side, and it's the old joke about the veteran of the great war who when asked by his grandson, what did you do in the war Grandad, he said I survived. I mean there was a real strong sense that it would be wonderful to the, that quick flash hero of coming right out and saying foursquare everything ought to change tomorrow. If, of course, you already had your ticket bought to take you on off to Boston where you'd be lionized because you could no longer exist economically in Mississippi or Alabama. The only ones who could were ones who were independent of the place in which they lived for their livelihood. Lillian Smith did and could because she was a brave and vibrant and ahead-of-her-time-woman, but also because she didn't live off the land in the sense of a person who had a business, or was in a profession, or had a newspaper. And those who went all the way editorially, and they were few and far between, did not stay. One by one they were gone.