Interview with Hodding Carter III
QUESTION 20
INTERVIEWER:

IF THERE'S ONE MOMENT THAT STANDS OUT IN YOUR OWN PERSONAL EXPERIENCE, AS A SOUTHERNER IN RELATION TO THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT, WHERE YOU FELT YOU ABSOLUTELY HAD TO TAKE A POSITION, THERE WAS NO BACKING DOWN FROM IT, WHAT WOULD YOU THINK OF?

Hodding Carter III:

Well, you'd have to say two things. First for me, my life was a lot easier than most southern whites who consider themselves people of good will and trying to find a way out, because I had my father who had already established a position which, while by northern standards may have seemed conservative, by Mississippi standards seemed radical. So that when I came along, I already had that platform from which to change and so I changed from '59 when I came back to the paper as an editorial writer in what I was saying publicly, while I had already changed radically in what I felt privately. What I wrote increasingly came into correspondence with what I felt. And the line was finally crossed from which there wasn't any return with the murder of the boys in '64. And that…