Interview with Hodding Carter III
QUESTION 3
INTERVIEWER:

WHAT WERE SOME OF THOSE LAWS THAT CHANGED, JUST SOME EXAMPLES OF HOW THINGS CHANGED?

Hodding Carter III:

It sort of went across, it went across the board. To begin with, nothing changed. The laws were committed to insuring that nothing would change. You still had schools which were rigidly segregated black and white, and laws were passed to make sure that if the courts or other outside forces required that they be integrated they would be closed. Laws were passed to see to it that state monies might be used for private education—all white. Laws were passed to try to guarantee that voting, which was a function reserved almost exclusively for whites in Mississippi, so exclusively that, perhaps twelve thousand blacks voted in the general election of 1955, was going to be reserved still for whites. That is voting would be a function so exclusively maintained by the white voting registrars, that no new black registrants could got [sic] on. Well, what kind of laws? Laws such as a requirement for a good moral character to be decided by each individual registrar of the eighty-two counties. Requirements that you had to interpret a section of the state constitution to the satisfaction subjectively of a registrar in each of the eighty-two counties.