Interview with Judge Robert Carter
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

NOW WHY WOULD EDUCATION RATHER THAN PUBLIC FACILITIES? WAS IT EDUCATION BECAUSE IT WAS AN EMOTIONAL ISSUE?

Judge Robert Carter:

No, it wasn't. No, it was—it wasn't just—we went on public facilities, we brought cases before the Interstate Commerce Commission about segregation on trains, interstate transportation. We brought a case to the Supreme Court involving segregation of buses, Morgan versus Virginia, application of segre—of the Southern state laws to interstate commerce. I don't remember actually any case on hotels and things like that. I don't recall that. But it was really a broadside attack. We had started in the—in schools, and we were kind of concentrated on law because we thought that the judges would better understand what what we were trying to to show in in a Law School. But our attack really was broadside.