Interview with Stokley Carmichael
QUESTION 39
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Tell me about the tactics?

STOKELY CARMICHAEL:

The tactics used there was to, ah, scream at Mr. Wilkins and, ah, Mr. Young and to, ah, insult them and to, ah, make it appear as if they were lackeys of the White power structure. And that the only task in the march was to water it down and to put forth the, ah, sentiments and the policies of the White establishment in the country. Ah, both Mr. Young and Mr. Wilkins,ah, before they could get a chance to deny it were booed out by insults and even some curses. So, Mr. Wilkins first, packing up his briefcase informed us that never would he participate in anything with any people like this and especially with me. And, ah, walked out the door. We were elated but there was still Mr. Young left, so we turned our, directed our attentions to him and he too soon followed. During the entire speech, Dr. Martin Luther King said absolutely nothing during this intercourse where we were trying to, ah, through our verbal abuse intimidate them from participating in the, in the march. And it was verbal abuse to the highest order, of the highest order. Ah, when they left, and they finally gone. I quickly turned to Dr. King who had never seen me in this light but who had known me for years and, ah, couldn't understand exactly what was happening. But we also knew that while King would not attack Young and Wilkins he would also be happy for them to be out the way. Because if they're out the way, he would in fact have the limelight over myself and McKissick. So, the tactics were good for him even though he would not participate in them or might even condemn them. But once they left I turned to him I said, OK Dr. King, let's get on with our march.