Interview with Ben Chavis
QUESTION 25
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Give me a sense of what you personally felt had been accomplished. It's the last day of the convention. What are you feeling?

BEN CHAVIS:

Well I felt, there were several, ah, feelings that I had personally about the accomplishments of the convention.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Sorry. Could you just go back and just say, "on the last day--"

SAM POLLARD:

it was good when you said it felt like a revival.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Yeah--

BEN CHAVIS:

On the last day of the convention, I mean, I was feeling like I had been at a revival. I mean, all I was waiting for was the benediction. So I could go home and tell all the people about the good news of what, what the convention decided, in terms of deciding the items on the National Black Agenda. For the first time, we will all have an agenda that we will take up, throughout the nation, to work on, together. And I was excited about that. And personally, I think it was, ah, a moment of, ah, ah, of remembrance, and also of fulfillment. I mean, I remember all the sisters and brothers who would have liked to, to come to Gary, ah, but who, who were no longer with us. You know, I, I, in a sense, ah, I had a good, great feeling that day, on the last day of the convention. But also I had a feeling of, of hoping that, ah, ah, some of the sisters and brothers who had been lost in the struggle, ah, ah, that we were at least showing that they didn't die in vain. We were at least showing that their suffering was not in vain. And that the struggle has a sense of continuity to it. I mean, the Gary Convention gave us all the step forward that was needed, ah, to prop us up and give us the renewed energy that we needed to go back home and to continue those struggles that we were all involved in.