Interview with Dr. Kenneth Clark
QUESTION 1
INTERVIEWER:

WHAT, I WONDER IF WE COULD START BY HAVING YOU GLANCE FOR US THIS SE—WHAT SEGREGATION WAS IN THE EARLY 1950'S. IN PARTICULAR, HOW IT AFFECTED THE CHILDREN THAT YOU WERE TESTING?

Dr. Kenneth Clark:

Well, segregation was and is a way in which a society tells a group of human beings that they are inferior to other groups of human beings in the society—and it really is internalized—that children learning that they cannot go to the same schools as other children, and the schools that they are required to attend are always clearly inferior to the schools that others are permitted to attend. It influences the child's view of himself, his being inferior to the others, is as reinforced by other things in the society such as restrictions in public accommodations, transportation. When a whole society is organized to establish the inferior, reinforce the inferior status of these individuals, it lowers their self esteem. It makes them feel that they're not as worthy as the non-segregated groups of human beings, and this continues pretty much through the rest of their lives.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

STOP FOR A MOMENT. MAKE SURE EVERYONE'S HAPPY. SPEED—