Interview with Dr. Kenneth Clark
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

WE'VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT THE TESTING AS A GENERAL TOPIC. DO YOU REMEMBER ANYTHING, ANYTHING IN PARTICULAR ABOUT THE CLARENDON COUNTY QUESTION, ANY OF THE RESPONSES THERE?

Dr. Kenneth Clark:

The responses in the Clarendon. County testing, again was something which was requested by the lawyers who had read the material that we had published, before we knew that there was any litigation. And then the lawyers wanted to know if their plaintiffs, the children in Clarendon County, the black children, would have the same results as those that we had tested ten years earlier. So they asked me to, to go into Clarendon County and I wasn't all that happy about it 'cause there was a lot of violence, and threats of violence, in there and would say, "Well, you have to go there anyway." So, and my wife, by the way, didn't want me to go. She had been from the south and she was aware—more aware of violence than I. But anyway, I went, and sent someone in—the head of the NAACP in South Carolina went with me. By the way, he was threatened in my presence there, but we had to test those children. And I went and used the same methods as I think that I do in the earlier studies, and the results were the same. These children saw themselves as inferior and they accepted the inferiority as part of reality. I mean they—they were separated from life. They—they went to segregated schools, and these realities were reflected in the results of our, of our tests. [sound fades].